Rally for fair fertility funding

It was great to be able to attend the rally at Westminster this evening organised by Fertility Network UK as part of their Scream4IVF campaign to try to push for fair funding for IVF based on the NICE guidelines, which conclude that it is both clinically effective and cost-effective to offer three full cycles of treatment to eligible women who are under the age of 40.

There were a range of excellent speakers at the rally including Fertility Network UK’s Chief Executive, Aileen Feeney, and London Organiser, Anya Sizer. They were joined by Paula Sherriff MP, Steve McCabe MP and author and Director of Fertility Fest Jessica Hepburn as well as Damion Sizer giving a male point of view and the brilliant Hope Sizer talking from the perspective of someone conceived by IVF.

It was an inspiring rally, and ended with some of the recorded screams (which were very loud!) and an opportunity to Scream for IVF ourselves. If you haven’t already signed the campaign petition to get a parliamentary debate on IVF, it’s not too late – you can find it here 

Thanks to Steve McCabe

We should all thank Steve McCabe, the Member of Parliament for Birmingham Selly Oak for raising the issue of NHS funding for fertility treatment in a Backbench Business Debate at Westminster supported by Tom Brake, the MP for Carshalton and Wallington, and Ed Vaizey, the MP for Didcot and Wantage. He’d been contacted by a number of constituents about the problems of the postcode lottery for fertility treatment, and called on the Health Secretary to investigate the cost disparities and the variations of IVF provision across England to find out why NICE guidance isn’t being followed universally.

The Health Minister Nicola Blackwood said that she would be writing to NHS England to ask that it communicates clearly with CCGs the expectation that NICE fertility guidelines should be followed by all.

It is a difficult time for the NHS which we know faces financial challenges, but stopping funding IVF would make little difference to the monetary woes – and indeed may actually end up costing far more if you factor in the long-term distress and depression caused by not being able to access treatment and the risk of patients having multiple embryo transfers overseas and returning with multiple pregnancies which can lead to health risks for both mother and baby.

The debate at Westminster was not well-attended, despite a big campaign by the charity Fertility Network and the campaign group Fertility Fairness. If you haven’t written to your MP about the problems of the postcode lottery yet, it is not too late. You can find details of how to find your MP and what to write on the Fertility Network website and if you are interested in watching the Westminster debate, you can find it here