Latest report on clinic incidents

4cell_embryo.tifThe fertility regulator, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, has just published its report on the number of incidents in fertility clinics. These incidents can be all kinds of things going wrong in a clinic from a patient suffering from hyperstimulation to a letter sent to the wrong person by mistake.

Incidents in fertility clinics are rare – they occur in less than one percent of the treatments performed in the UK fertility clinics – but each incident is one too many.

The HFEA’s annual report on fertility clinic incidents shows that the total number of incidents increased slightly but for the first time since the HFEA began publishing incidents reports, there were no A grade (the most serious) incidents reported at all.

HFEA Chair Sally Cheshire called on fertility clinics to substantially reduce the rate of incidents next year. She said “The UK’s fertility sector is one of the most developed in the world, and the high level of professionalism in the sector is highlighted by both the fact that fewer than 600 incidents were reported out of more than 72,000 treatments, and that no ‘grade A’ incidents were reported in the last year. We want to ensure clinics give patients the best possible treatment, so that they have the best chances of having the families they so dearly want. So, while incidents are already occurring infrequently, we want to see them reduce even further. I’m setting the challenge to all clinics in the UK to make sure that the overall number of incidents has decreased by this time next year. It’s not only ‘grade A’ incidents that can have an adverse effect on patients. All incidents, whether it’s a letter sent to the wrong address, or a case of ovarian hyper-stimulation, can have serious consequences for patients, and more has got to be done to make sure that fewer people are affected in the future.”

The report can be found here: www.hfea.gov.uk/9449.html.

Fertility Fest – when art meets science

images-6It will be the first event of its kind in the UK taking place in London and Birmingham, and it’s called Fertility Fest. The event, devised by writer Jessica Hepburn and producer Gabby Vautier, will bring together some of the country’s leading writers, visual artists, theatre-makers, film-directors and composers alongside some of the country’s foremost fertility experts for a day of performance, discussion and debate. Topics under the artistic microscope include facing the diagnosis of infertility, IVF, donation, surrogacy, the male experience, egg freezing, involuntary childlessness and alternative routes to parenthood.The full day of events concludes with a performance of a new play from award-winning writer Gareth Farr called The Quiet House about one couple’s journey when they enter the world of IVF.

Fertility Fest is in London on Saturday June 11 at the Park Theatre in Finsbury Park and in Birmingham on Saturday May 28 at Birmingham Repertory Theatre. The artists involved in the days include Aaron Deemer, Amanda Gore, Amy Rosenthal, Fergus Davidson, Fiona Duffelen, Gabby Vautier, Gareth Farr, Jessica Hepburn, Jo Ind, Jody Day, Julia Copus, Jude Christian, Kazuko Hohki, Katie Barlow, Louise Ann Wilson, Matthew Dunster, Paula Knight, Peter Guttridge, Stander Chohan, Ronke Adekoluejo, Sarah Esdaile, Somalia Seaton, Steve Ball, Tabitha Moses, Tina Reid-Persin and Yann Seznec. The experts in the field joining them for the day will include Professor Allan, Pacey, Professor Geeta Nargund, Laura Witjens, Professor Jacky Boivin, Janine Elson, Juliet Tizzard, Kate Brian, Natalie Silverman, Sally Cheshire, Dr Sofia Gameiro, Dr Sue Avery, Professor Susan Bewley, Professor Susan Golombok, Tracey Sainsbury and Victoria MacDonald.

Tickets cost £25 a day which include all workshops, talks and a performance of The Quiet House – for more details and booking, visit the website www.fertilityfest.com

Report on incidents in fertility clinics

images-6If you’re having treatment at a fertility clinic, you may be interested in a new report from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority which looks at the number of incidents or mistakes that happen in the UK’s fertility clinics. It may sound alarming, but sometimes things don’t go exactly to plan and encouraging clinics to report to the HFEA when this happens can help them to prevent problems occurring in the future and to share experiences so that others can learn from what has happened too.

The new report shows that the number of incidents at fertility clinics is going down, and that they occur in less than one percent of treatment cycles.  However, that does mean a total of 465 occasions when something went wrong, and it can be distressing if this happens to you. Only two of these were in the most serious grade A category, and the largest group were in category C, the lowest grade, which might sometimes mean an administrative error, for example a patient being sent a letter meant for someone else.

The HFEA Chair Sally Cheshire urged clinics to use the practical help available from the HFEA to that we can offer to do more to improve patient care: “Whilst every incident that takes place is one too many, I particularly want clinics to concentrate on reducing their grade B and C incidents. Such mistakes are often distressing to patients, largely avoidable and frankly shouldn’t happen. The small reduction in incidents is a step in the right direction but more can and must be done by clinics, and we can help. Since our last report, we have worked with clinics to improve their systems and practices. For example, where clinics are struggling to recognise what changes need to be made to avoid future incidents, our clinical governance team offers bespoke incident training to individual centres. It is for clinics now to step up and make the necessary changes so that everyone affected by assisted reproduction receives the best possible care. I want to see these improvements realised by the time of our next annual report.”

You can download the report itself here