Could scientists have found a cure for PCOS?

It’s incredibly common, but little has been known about what causes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Now scientists in France think they may have found the solution. They believe PCOS may be triggered by exposure to high levels of Anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) in the womb which may overstimulate brain cells and raise the level of testosterone in the body.

Experimenting on mice, the researchers were able to reverse the effect of the AMH by using a drug which can be used to control hormones and they are now planning to trial this in women. If it works, it could be a solution to restore ovulation in women with POCS.

PCOS is a very common condition, and women who experience it have a number of symptoms often may include irregular periods, excess body hair, weight gain, oily skin and cysts on the ovaries. Many, but not all, experience difficulties trying to conceive and PCOS is often a cause of fertility problems. You can read more about the new research in New Scientist here.

For advice and support for PCOS

UnknownDid you know that as many as one in five women has polycystic ovaries, and between five to ten per cent have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) which occurs when women who have polycystic ovaries also have additional symptoms – including difficult conceiving. It is one of the main causes of fertility problems for women, but many people are unaware of the syndrome unless they have some personal experience of PCOS.

The symptoms can include irregular periods and ovulation, unwanted facial or body hair, oily skin, acne, thinning hair or hair loss and weight problems which may mean being overweight and having difficulty losing weight. It can also cause depression and mood changes. If you’ve been diagnosed with PCOS and want more information, the charity Verity can offer lots of support and advice – check them out at www.verity-pcos.org.uk

Weight loss and PCOS

800px-Belly-2354_1920_(1)If you’ve got polycystic ovary syndrome, a common fertility problem, you may have been told to lose weight or to take up more exercise.  Now, a new study from researchers at Penn State College of Medicine in the USA has shown that this advice really can make a difference.

The study found that women who were supported to make lifestyle changes, reducing their calorie intake with a specified diet and taking more exercise, lost significant amounts of weight and improvements in their reproductive health. You can read the study itself here 

 

Why you should never forget breakfast…

Many women who lead busy lives end up skipping breakfast, but new research from the University of Tel Aviv has shown that eating a big breakfast can have a positive impact for women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

Women with PCOS can produce too much insulin, which can decrease fertility by affecting ovulation, and are often told that losing weight will help balance insulin levels – and cutting out breakfast can seem a good way to deal with this.  However, not everyone with PCOS is overweight and this particular study looked at women who fall within the normal weight range. One group were given a high-calorie breakfast, average lunch and low-calorie supper, and the others were given a low-calorie breakfast, average lunch and high-calorie supper – but both groups had the same number of calories in total each day.

The results showed that although neither group had experienced any weight loss or gain, the group who ate a big breakfast saw a drop in their levels of insulin and testosterone – and they had a 50% increase in their ovulation rate!

This isn’t going to be a weight-loss solution, but the research team believe that eating a big breakfast and smaller supper could also have an impact on some of the other symptoms which are often associated with PCOS such as skin problems and excess body hair. You can read more about the research here 

 

 

 

 

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers: