IVF success rates

I’ve just been reading about an overseas clinic which claims an IVF success rate of more than 90% per IVF cycle started, including frozen embryo transfers. I could understand why this would seem an incredibly attractive prospect to anyone who needs fertility treatment – not only is IVF cheaper than it would be in the UK, it also appears to be far more successful. But is it? Does any clinic really have a success rate of 90%?

One of the main differences for the apparent discrepancies between outcomes at clinics here in the UK and the rates some overseas clinics claim is the way that they are presented. Here in the UK, you can check validated IVF outcomes on the HFEA website. These are accurate figures for live births over a set period. Some of the amazing rates you see on overseas clinic websites are not for live births but for positive pregnancy tests, and as we know that one in four pregnancies ends in miscarriage, it is not surprising that live birth rates are always lower than pregnancy rates.

The figures you get from the HFEA will also show you the outcomes for women of different ages. Birth rates after IVF in the UK range from  2% to 33% depending on the woman’s age. The HFEA figures show you outcomes over a set period – a specific year, or a three-year period. If you are running a clinic elsewhere and happen to have a month where you have very good outcomes and lots of women get pregnant, followed by a month where no one does, what’s stopping you from using your good month as your “success rate”?  So a success rate may be for a short period, for younger women and it may be pregnancy rather than live birth – and all of these things make a huge difference. What’s more, sometimes the figures are simply wrong. I’ve read some crazy claims for totally impossible success rates, particularly for older women using their own eggs. The truth is that IVF is less successful as we get older, and miscarriage presents a greater risk.

Many overseas clinics offer very good fertility services, but if you are thinking about treatment abroad do be careful about hyped figures and unrealistic claims about outcomes. Know what is likely and what is possible, and be wary of clinic websites claiming successes which are totally out of kilter with anything you’ve ever seen elsewhere, especially for successes for older women using their own eggs, as this may suggest a clinic which is prepared to be somewhat economical with the truth.

Night shifts and your fertility

A really interesting new study has found that women who worked night shifts or who had jobs involving heavy lifting produced fewer eggs when having fertility treatment than those who worked normal day shifts. The research team from the United States investigated around 500 women who filled in detailed questionnaires about their work shift patterns and any heavy lifting involved in their jobs. The researchers found that there were clear differences in the number of eggs produced by women who worked at night and those who did heavy lifting at work.

I found this study particularly fascinating as I worked night shifts before I started trying to conceive, and was very aware of the negative impact it had on my overall health – but often wondered whether it could affect fertility too. This was an observational study – which means the researchers were not linking cause and effect but just seeing what happened with the different groups of women and fertility experts have urged caution in interpreting the results. However, if you are doing a job which involves working nights or a lot of heavy lifting and are having difficulty getting, the study would suggest it may be worth investigating if there is anything you can do to change your shift pattern or lifting at work.

You can read the full details of the research from the Journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine here along with reports from The Telegraph and the Evening Standard.