Preventing cervical cancer.

It’s Cervical Cancer Prevention Week, and if you’re due a smear test, make sure you make an appointment now! Women who are trying to get pregnant still need to have regular smear tests, and if you’re worried about it clashing with treatment, discuss this with a healthcare professional. Screening is so important because it can help to protect you from cervical cancer, as can making sure you know about the symptoms and by seeking medical help if you experience these. The symptoms of cervical cancer may include abnormal bleeding between periods or after intercourse, unusual vaginal discharge, discomfort or pain during intercourse and lower back pain.

Around 3,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer every year in the UK, and it’s the most common cancer in women who are under 36. The vast majority of cervical cancers are caused by infections with a virus called high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is an extremely common virus and it is passed from one person to another through skin to skin contact in the genital area. About 80% of sexually active adults are infected with some type of HPV at some time in their lives but for most of them this won’t lead to cancer.

You can find lots of useful information about every aspect of cervical cancer on the Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust website.