Have you had fertility treatment in the last 5 years?

If you have had fertility treatment in the UK in the last five years, would you be willing to help identify key areas for improvement to ensure everyone receives high-quality care in the future?

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) which regulates fertility clinics in the UK has launched a national fertility patient survey and your views are vital to help the Authority understand experiences of treatment. The survey is being run by YouGov, and the more people that take part, the clearer the views and the greater the impact.

This is an excellent opportunity to help other people going through fertility treatment by giving the information and opinions the HFEA needs to help ensure these are taken into consideration in the future. The survey takes about 15 minutes to complete, and the link is here.

Scream for IVF!

The patient charity Fertility Network UK has launched a new campaign today called Scream 4 IVF which aims to raise awareness of the unfairness of the postcode lottery for fertility treatment. Currently a majority of those who need fertility treatment end up paying for themselves, and local commissioners who decide how to spend NHS funds are often ignoring the guidance from NICE on this and rationing fertility treatment.

The new campaign asks you to upload yourself screaming on social media with the #Scream4IVF and link to the petition bit.ly/Scream4IVF to call for a debate in parliament on fertility funding. Of course, you also need to sign it yourself!

Please, do support this important work – if you don’t want to scream, just sign – whatever you can do will help. You can find the campaign website at https://www.scream4ivf.org

Could scientists have found a cure for PCOS?

It’s incredibly common, but little has been known about what causes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Now scientists in France think they may have found the solution. They believe PCOS may be triggered by exposure to high levels of Anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) in the womb which may overstimulate brain cells and raise the level of testosterone in the body.

Experimenting on mice, the researchers were able to reverse the effect of the AMH by using a drug which can be used to control hormones and they are now planning to trial this in women. If it works, it could be a solution to restore ovulation in women with POCS.

PCOS is a very common condition, and women who experience it have a number of symptoms often may include irregular periods, excess body hair, weight gain, oily skin and cysts on the ovaries. Many, but not all, experience difficulties trying to conceive and PCOS is often a cause of fertility problems. You can read more about the new research in New Scientist here.

Thinking of having treatment overseas?

If you are considering going abroad for fertility treatment, you may be interested in this article I wrote for a supplement for The Times earlier this week.

For many people, going overseas can be a cheaper option, and many return with positive stories about their experiences, but you do need to be aware of the facts and understand the differences you may find if you choose to have treatment outside the UK.

There are some great clinics across the globe, but there are also some that are not quite so great and you don’t have the protection that you have here in the UK of knowing that all  clinics offering IVF are licensed and regularly inspected by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority. As you don’t have that luxury with clinics elsewhere, you do need to make sure you do your homework and research as much as you can about the clinic and the country to ensure that you are left feeling that you did the right thing in choosing to travel for treatment.

The IVF diary

If you haven’t seen the final episode of Hannah and Lewis Vaughan-Jones’ video diary of their IVF journey, you can find it here on YouTube. It made me cry, and I think Hannah and Lewis are incredibly brave to have been so open about their experiences – not only is it heartening to anyone going through fertility problems themselves, it’s also hugely helpful to friends, families and colleagues to give them an insight into the reality of treatment. All too often people dismiss infertility as some kind of selfish 21st century indulgence – mostly, of course, those who’ve managed to conceive without any trouble themselves. By being so honest, Hannah and Lewis have given a vivid illustration of the very real pain and suffering that is all too familiar to the one in seven of us who have personal experience of fertility problems.

So thank you to Hannah and Lewis for doing this and for telling your story on behalf of us all. It is not an easy path to take, but perhaps there is some solace in knowing how much you have helped so many other people – and very best wishes for the future.

Add ons – do they add up?

I gave a talk at The Fertility Show on Saturday about add ons, and promised to put my notes on the blog, so these are some of the key points, and links to useful sources of information.

What are add-ons?

  • They are additional treatments which your clinic may offer on top of IVF/ICSI
  • They are new or emerging treatments and there may be limited evidence about how effective they are
  • Some may have shown some promising results in initial studies but may not be proven to improve pregnancy or birth rates
  • Some clinics offer lots of add ons and may give you what looks like a shopping list of additional treatments to choose from. Some don’t offer them. This isn’t an indication of how good or forward-thinking a clinic is – some fertility experts may not be convinced that some add ons are worthwhile or safe.
  • Some clinics charge for add ons, others may include particular add ons in the cost of treatment because they think they make a difference and believe they should be part of IVF.
  • Add ons can be expensive and may substantially increase what you pay for your IVF

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has a list of some of the more common add ons you may be offered on their website, and a grading system for them

They include:

  • Assisted hatching
  • Artificial egg activation
  • Elective freeze-all cycles
  • Embryo glue
  • Endometrial scratch
  • Intrauterine culture
  • Pre-implantation genetic screening (PGS)
  • Reproductive Immunology
  • Time-lapse imaging

It can be difficult to know what to think about these new treatments, and the HFEA carried out patient survey to try to find out what people thought. The views ranged from those who were very strongly in favour of add ons to those who felt patients should not be offered treatments that we don’t know work. The overwhelming feeling from patients was that they didn’t want to miss out on something which might make a difference, but that this had to be balanced by the need to protect their interests.

Assessing the evidence is key and you want to know is:

  • What evidence there is about how effective something is
  • What evidence there is about whether it is safe
  • Does it carry any risks
  • How much does it cost

How do you assess the evidence?

As lay people, when we hear about evidence we may give any research or scientific paper equal weight, but in fact evidence isn’t quite as black and white as we may think.

 

The best scientific evidence comes from randomised controlled trials. In these trials, people will be divided into those who have the new technique or treatment and those who don’t in a randomised way. It is important when assessing evidence to look at whether the study included all patients or just a specific group. Sometimes research may have a narrow age range, or may have only looked at people with one specific type of fertility problem.

You should also look at the number of people included in the study. The most meaningful research will have involved a large group but sometimes you may discover that studies have taken place in one specific clinic and may involve tiny numbers of people.

Finally, check the outcomes. You want to look at studies where a healthy live birth is the outcome but some studies may stop at a fertilised egg or positive pregnancy test and this may not translate into an increase in births.

How the HFEA can help

The HFEA got together a group of leading scientists and fertility experts to look at all the existing research on each of the add ons, to assess it and to develop a traffic light system for add ons.

There is a green symbol where there is more than one good quality study which shows that the procedure is effective and safe.

A yellow symbol where there is a some evidence or some promising results but where further research is still required.

And a red symbol where there is no evidence to show something works or that it is safe

The decisions made by the group were then re-assessed by an expert in evidence to ensure every traffic light had been correctly assigned.

Green lights

Not one of the add ons mentioned at the start was given a green light to say that there is “more than one good quality study which shows that the procedure is effective and safe”

Red lights

There are a few red lights which means there is currently no evidence for assisted hatching, intrauterine culture, PGS on day three and reproductive Immunology. There may also be risks here too so do read the evidence carefully on the HFEA’s information page.

Amber lights

A lot of the add ons fall into amber where more evidence is needed. This includes endometrial scratch, freeze all cycles, egg activation, embryo glue, PGS on day five or six and time lapse.

For two of the add ons in this category, freeze-all cycles and endometrial scratch, there are big multi-centre trials going on at present in clinics across the United Kingdom. If you want one of these add ons, ask your clinic if they are taking part in the trial as you could end up getting the add on itself free of charge (this doesn’t cover the cost of the IVF/ICSI and you may be randomised into the other part of the trial and not get the add on, but it may be a good way forward if can’t afford to pay for the add on)

The cost of add ons

Some clinics offer add ons such as embryo glue or time lapse as part of a treatment cycle to every patient they treat. Others charge, and prices can vary hugely. There is often no discernible reason for wide discrepancies in price, so do look into this by finding out what a number of different clinics are charging for any add on you are considering.

Key questions

If your clinic offers you an add on, make sure you ask some questions first:

  • Why are you offering me this treatment?
  • What evidence is there that it works?
  • What increase in success have you seen with patients similar to me?
  • What are you charging and how does it compare to other clinics?
  • If you are charging more, why is this?

There are also some questions to ask yourself:

  • Are you happy with the evidence your clinic has given you?
  • Have you read the information on the HFEA website?
  • Can you afford to pay for it?
  • If you pay for it, would it affect your chances of being able to pay for another cycle if it doesn’t work?

Whatever you decide,make sure you are as fully informed as you can be about your treatment, and make sure you have read through all the evidence on the HFEA website which is there to help you to make an informed decision about your treatment.

Fertility milestones

In support of National Fertility Awareness Week, the HFEA or Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority which regulates the fertility sector, has published data which reveals some new milestones for UK fertility treatment.

More than 300,000 children in total have now been born in the UK from licensed fertility treatment since 1991. Fertility treatment has grown markedly since 2010, with almost a third of all IVF and DI babies since 1991 arriving in the last six recorded years (2010 to 2015).

The total number of treatment cycles carried out in UK clinics also passed a significant milestone in 2015, breaking through the million barrier. The overall number of treatments carried out since 1991 is 1,034,601.

The new data – drawn from The HFEA Register, the oldest and largest fertility database in the world – also reveals that fertility services are used mainly by younger women. The average age of women having fertility treatment is 35 years, which has remained largely static over recent years.

Treatments involving women aged 18-34 remain the largest single group, accounting for 43% of all treatments, while treatments for women aged 40 and over account for just 20% of all treatments with very few treatments being provided to women over 45.

Looking at the different regions in the UK, the data shows that most treatments continue to take place in London and the South East of England, accounting for 42% of all cycles. However, there is a strong representation of large northern clinics in the figures, with the North West now providing more treatments per clinic than any other region, including London. Total clinic numbers vary according to region, ranging from three in Northern Ireland to 22 in London.

HFEA Chair Sally Cheshire CBE welcomed this new data as a sign of a thriving and successful fertility sector: “The figures we have released today show that the UK’s fertility sector continues to be one of the most vibrant and successful in the world. Families using assisted reproduction services across the UK are better served than ever before, and we will continue to encourage all who work in the sector to offer the highest quality support for patients who are both successful and unsuccessful.”

Susan Seenan, chief executive of patient charity Fertility Network UK said “We welcome the publication during National Fertility Awareness Week of the new IVF milestones from the HFEA. The extraordinary growth of IVF in the last six years shows the pressing need for practical and emotional support and advice for the many people facing fertility issues. It is also significant to note that this data underlines that fertility services are used mainly by younger women – aged under 35 – who will have been trying for a baby for at least two years and often more. National Fertility Awareness Week is about challenging perceptions and we hope this helps to dispel any misconceptions about IVF and female age.”

HFEA joins Facebook

You may want to have a look at – and follow – the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority’s new Facebook page. The HFEA regulates fertility treatment in the UK and is launching the page during National Fertility Awareness Week.

There are also a couple of very helpful videos on what it’s like to have IVF and ICSI. You can find out much more by having a look at the HFEA’s posts and you can follow for regular updates from the Authority.

Pregnant after fertility problems?

If you are pregnant after fertility problems, there is a brand new closed Facebook group that you can join. It is a closed space to talk to one another, to share experiences and to find news and information about pregnancy, birth and early parenting.

The group is for anyone who is pregnant or a new parent and we look forward to welcoming you. You can find the link for the page here https://www.facebook.com/groups/Pregnancyafterinfertility/

Your views needed!

If you are having fertility treatment, or have done recently, you may have been offered some additional extras on top of your IVF or ICSI. These additional treatments include things like time-lapse imaging, embryo glue, endometrial scratching or reproductive immunology. Not all clinics offer every type of additional treatment. Some may not suggest them at all, others include them in the price of IVF or you may be given the option to pay for add ons if you would like them.

Fertility Network UK, the patient charity, and the fertility regulator the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, or HFEA, is interested in finding out more about what you think about these add ons, how they should be offered and what you need in order to make decisions about whether to pay for them. Most of these add ons are not fully proven to increase your chance of getting pregnant.

If you have had treatment recently or are going through treatment currently, do take a minute to answer the short questionnaire to help them find out more about what your views are on this subject. You can find the link by clicking here

 

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