When IVF doesn’t work…

You may have heard in the news recently about the latest statistics on IVF success for women in their forties, and seen that Sally Cheshire, Chair of the fertility regulator the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), has spoken out about the need for fertility clinics to be more honest and open with patients about their chances of IVF success.

The latest figures show that the number of women in their forties having IVF has doubled since 2004, but only 75 women aged 42 and 43 will get pregnant using their own eggs, and once you reach the age of 44, just two women a year are successful. To put that into context, approaching 11,000 women who were over 40 had IVF in 2017.

Some clinicians say that women are entering into IVF with their eyes open, well aware of the chances of a successful outcome, but you don’t have to talk to many women who have had IVF to know that is often far from the case. When you are longing for a baby, you tend to hear the positives rather than the negatives, and when there’s a 5% chance of success, it’s the 5% you focus on rather than the 95% chance of your treatment not working.

It is difficult as sometimes women feel that although they may be 44 or 45 and know it is unlikely that treatment will work, they still want some kind of closure and need to know they’ve done everything they possibly could.

Sally Cheshire talks in her interview about being approached by clinics at the Fertility Show in Manchester and being given unrealistic suggestions of her chances of having successful IVF treatment. It is vital for clinics to be honest about this – and it doesn’t take much searching to find clinics publishing clinical pregnancy rates for women in their mid-forties which many will see as their chance of having a baby – when in fact, miscarriage rates are high for women of this age and these clinics know only too well that the live birth rate is very different from the clinical pregnancy rate.

You can read more about Sally Cheshire’s interview with the Telegraph here

Goodbye to Juliet

I don’t often put personal posts on this blog, but today I did want to say thank you to Juliet Tizzard who is leaving her role as Director of Strategy and Corporate Affairs at the regulatory body for fertility treatment, the HFEA. ┬áIf you’ve been to the Fertility Show in the past, you may have seen Juliet speaking there about how the Choose a Fertility Clinic pages on the HFEA website can help if you are trying to decide where to have treatment. She’s driven some of the exciting steps forward for the HFEA such as the new website where patients can find lots of helpful information about different clinics and can give feedback after they’ve had treatment. Juliet is moving on today to the Health Research Authority where she will do a fantastic job – but she will be missed!