Managing Mother’s Day

Carl_Strathmann_-_Bunch_of_Wild_Flowers_(13354976844)It’s one of the most difficult times of the year for anyone trying to conceive, and it’s here again. A day focused on celebrating motherhood is bound to be challenging for anyone who is longing for a family, but the time leading up to it can be the hardest part to deal with. It’s virtually impossible to escape Mother’s Day when every local shop has jumped on the commercial bandwagon and even the local supermarket seems to have decided to label anything you might possibly give to anyone else as a “Mother’s Day Gift”.

Mother’s Day can act as a horrible reinforcement of the sense of isolation and loneliness that you may feel as more and more of those around you seem to be pregnant or new parents. It can make you feel like an outsider whose life has become completely cut off form those around you.

 

If you know anyone else who is experiencing difficulties getting pregnant or who doesn’t have children, this can be the ideal time for meeting up with them. Getting together for a day out, a trip to the cinema or theatre or sharing a meal can be a good way of reminding yourself that you are not alone. This Thursday evening, March 3, there’s a get together for anyone experiencing fertility problems in Central London and if you’d like to come along and join us you’d be very welcome (for details, email katebrian@infertilitynetworkuk.com).  On Sunday March 6 itself, you may be interested to know that Gateway Women’s Jody Day will be giving a live talk on BBC Radio’s Mother’s Day Service – you can find details here 

 

However you decide to spend Sunday, remember that you are not alone. There are around 3.5 million people in the UK alone who are going through difficulties at any given time, and every one of them will be experiencing very similar feelings about Mother’s Day.

 

Adoption

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Adoption_2-1We had a really interesting evening at the Central London fertility group last night with a great speaker, Pippa from First 4 Adoption. I’d been unsure about suggesting adoption as a topic as I know how fed up anyone trying to conceive gets with being asked why they don’t “just adopt”, but when I mooted the idea I got a really positive response.

We had a good turn out and the group had lots of questions for Pippa after her talk. She explained the basics about finding an adoption agency and registering, and discussed the children who are in need of adoptive families and how they are matched with parents. She was so warm and positive, and I think we all learnt a lot during the course of the evening.

If you are thinking of adoption as an option, or as a Plan B, C or even D, then you should check out the First 4 Adoption website which is full of useful advice and information.

Making sense of the science

ivf_science-300x168If you live or work in London and are having IVF treatment, you might be interested in joining the Central London fertility group meeting on the evening of November 12 where an embryologist will be present to answer your questions.  She’ll be able to talk about what happens in the lab, about embryo development, about fertilisation and about new treatments. There will also be time at the meeting to chat with others who are going through fertility tests and treatments and who understand what it is like.

The Central London group is run by Infertility Network UK and is a friendly group which is open to all. There is no charge for attending and no need to book in advance. If you’re interested, you can contact Kate for more details – katebrian@infertilitynetworkuk.com