Fertility Forum – bringing professionals and the public together

If you’ve ever wanted access to clear, reliable information about fertility problems and treatment, the Fertility Forum on 30 March is for you. Set up by patients working with all the professional bodies in the field, the Fertility Forum aims to be a day of pure evidence about fertility with no promotion for particular clinics or treatments, and no one selling anything. It’s all about evidence.

The Fertility Forum will take place at the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) in London, and many of the UK’s leading fertility specialists will be speaking at the day, and there will be three strands of talks. They will cover everything from nutrition and lifestyle advice to the latest developments in fertility treatment. There will be talks on specific fertility issues such as endometriosis and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), on donor treatments and surrogacy, on recurrent miscarriage, on stress and fertility support, on male fertility problems and how men deal with infertility. The HFEA will give advice on how to choose a fertility clinic and there will be a talk on deciding whether to opt for treatment abroad. How embryos develop and why IVF does and doesn’t work will also be discussed along with an assessment of the evidence on additional treatments like endometrial scratch or embryo glue, and there will be a session on accessing NHS funding. You will be able to choose which talks you attend when you get your tickets. There is a charge for the tickets (£25) to cover the cost of putting on the day, but there are no additional charges.

The day has been organised by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) and the British Fertility Society working in partnership with the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) and Fertility Network UK alongside the Association of British Andrologists, British Andrology Society, Association of Clinical Embryologists, British Infertility Counselling Association, Royal College of Nursing and the Senior Infertility Nurses Group. The Donor Conception Network will be taking part in the event along with other patient groups including the Miscarriage Association. The day will be opened by the RCOG President, Professor Lesley Regan, and the Chair of the HFEA, Sally Cheshire CBE.

To find out more and to buy your tickets go to http://bit.ly/FertilityForum

Advice on treatment add-ons

It is sometimes difficult as a patient in a fertility clinic to know whether it is worth paying for some or any of the add-on treatments you may be offered. Now, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), which regulates IVF clinics in the UK, and 10 of the leading professional and patient fertility groups, have agreed how treatment add-ons should be offered ethically in clinical practice in the UK in a consensus statement published today.

It’s published in response to growing evidence of add-ons being offered to patients, without conclusive evidence to date that any of them increase the chance of a pregnancy, and the fact that many patients feel they must do anything to improve the possibility of success. The aim is to create a culture change among fertility professionals in the UK.

Sally Cheshire CBE, Chair of the HFEA, said “We welcome the introduction of new treatments that could increase the chances of success, however, we want to see responsible innovation. Fertility treatment add-ons are being offered to more patients by clinics and we know many patients are asking for these add-ons and paying for them if they have private treatment. It’s crucial that clinics are transparent about the add-on treatments they offer, including the potential costs, to ensure patients know exactly whether they are likely to increase their chance of having a baby. That is why we’ve been working with professional groups such as the British Fertility Society to decide how unproven treatments into clinical practice should be correctly and ethically introduced, which is a vital step towards a more transparent approach in fertility services. We are now expecting clinics to provide information about treatment add-ons to patients, including what evidence there is of effectiveness.”

Alongside the principles for clinics, the HFEA has also published information on the most commonly offered add-ons, with a traffic light rating system, to help patients better understand the effectiveness of treatments they might consider.

Sally adds: “It’s crucial that patients inform themselves about the add-ons they may be offered, so that they can ask the right questions, and make the right choices, when choosing what treatment to have. We’ve produced ‘traffic light’ rated information on our website that keeps them up-to-date with the latest evidence on each of the most commonly offered add-ons.”

Jason Kasraie, Chair of the Association of Clinical Embryologists, said “We support greater transparency in the sector with regard to treatment add-ons. Whilst it is important that we work to ensure patients always receive the latest treatments and have access to new technologies in order to maximise their chance of treatment success, it is also essential that we ensure patients are fully informed and that only procedures or technologies that are evidence based are used.”

Key principles of the consensus statement are:

  • Clinics should only offer treatment add-ons where more than one high quality study demonstrates a treatment add-on to be safe and effective.
  • Clinics should stop offering the treatment add-on to patients if concerns are raised regarding safety or effectiveness.
  • Patients must be clearly informed of the experimental nature of any treatment add-on which is offered, where there is no robust evidence of its safety and/or effectiveness
  • Patients should not be charged extra to take part in a clinical trial.

The General Medical Council, has welcomed the statement. Chief Executive, Charlie Massey said: “We welcome this consensus statement, which will help protect fertility patients from poor practice and feeling pressure to accept additional, unproven extras. Patients deserve to have the best available evidence so they can make informed decisions, in partnership with doctors. It’s vital that doctors innovate responsibly and place patient safety first and foremost. Our guidance on consent sets out how doctors should work with patients to make decisions together about care and treatment options. Doctors working in the fertility sector must ensure that patients have information about the options available to them, including risks and available evidence, as well as any potential benefits.”

You can read the statement here and find out more about the HFEA’s traffic light system for add-ons here