Pregnancy loss

I’ve only just seen this incredibly moving article in The Guardian about the experience of miscarriage – you don’t need to have been through the loss of a pregnancy yourself to empathise with this piece. It does make you think about how little other people appreciate or understand what it feels like to lose a baby – especially when this happens more than once. Well worth reading – thanks Amy for writing it.

If you are affected by miscarriage, the Miscarriage Association can offer really valuable help and support.

Progesterone does not stop recurrent miscarriage

There have long been questions about the use of progesterone supplements for women who have experienced recurrent miscarriages. It was thought that progesterone treatment could help in such circumstances, and it has been used for decades. Now a team at the University of Birmingham have conducted a trial which shows that it doesn’t improve outcomes for women who have had a history of recurrent miscarriages. However, the research shows that it doesn’t do any harm either, so women who have used progesterone supplements do not need to worry about this.

You can read more about the five year trial, led by Professor Arri Coomarasamy, and published in the New England Journal of Medicine on the University of Birmingham website.

 

The wave of light for baby loss awareness week

800px-Triptic_of_candlesI wanted to add a post this week for Baby Loss Awareness Week. Today, October 15, is the international Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Day and this evening everyone can take part in a “Wave of Light” by lighting a candle at 7pm to remember all the babies who have died during pregnancy, at, during or after birth.

Experiencing a miscarriage or losing a baby is a devastating thing to happen to anyone, but if you’ve been finding it difficult to get pregnant and have been trying to conceive for a while before this happened, it is a very bitter double blow.

By lighting a candle tonight, you can join a ‘Wave of Light’ around the world in memory of all the babies who have been lost. You can be join together with others by taking a photo of your candle and post it to Facebook or Twitter using #WaveOfLight at 7pm.

We are failing women who lose a baby

Nearly half of women who have had a miscarriage are made to wait more than 24 hours to have a scan to check what has happened, according to a new survey of more than a thousand women for the website Mumsnet. The survey also found that one in five women had to wait for more than three days to get a scan – and once they were in hospital nearly half were treated next to women who had ongoing pregnancies.

Women who miscarried at home were often not offered adequate pain relief, and just 15% who miscarried at home after having a scan felt that they had the right support, information and pain relief to manage at home.

As anyone with any vague stirrings of empathy would appreciate, emotional support is essential after losing a baby but despite the fact that 58% of the women who responded wanted counselling, just 12% were actually offered it.

The results of the survey show a shocking lack of care and support for women who are going through a traumatic experience – and Mumsnet are suggesting people tweet the following politicians to ask for their support to change things for the better –  Jeremy Hunt (@Jeremy_Hunt), Andy Burnham (@andyburnhammp) and Norman Lamb (@normanlamb)