Scream4IVF

I am sure you will all be aware of Fertility Network UK’s Scream4IVF campaign, aimed at ending the postcode lottery for IVF treatment. If you haven’t signed the petition yet which calls for a parliamentary debate on the subject you can do so here. The charity has been asking people to donate their scream on social media to give a voice to people with fertility problems and allow their frustrations to be aired. The screams will be collated to form the world’s longest scream for IVF to be played at a rally outside Westminster. The charity is encouraging people to join them at at the rally which takes place at Richmond Terrace at Westminster on October 10th from 5pm to 7pm.

Have you had fertility treatment in the last 5 years?

If you have had fertility treatment in the UK in the last five years, would you be willing to help identify key areas for improvement to ensure everyone receives high-quality care in the future?

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) which regulates fertility clinics in the UK has launched a national fertility patient survey and your views are vital to help the Authority understand experiences of treatment. The survey is being run by YouGov, and the more people that take part, the clearer the views and the greater the impact.

This is an excellent opportunity to help other people going through fertility treatment by giving the information and opinions the HFEA needs to help ensure these are taken into consideration in the future. The survey takes about 15 minutes to complete, and the link is here.

The cost of IVF

When you’re thinking about having IVF and looking at different clinics, the logical place to start is clinic websites – but it is increasingly apparent that when it comes to the cost of a cycle of treatment, that might not be as helpful as it should be. The headline prices for IVF on clinic websites have always been lower than the price patients pay as they rarely include the drugs used during a treatment cycle which adds considerably to the bill. Recently, however, I’ve spoken to a number of patients who have paid up to twice as much as the price their clinic websites have suggested a cycle costs. That’s not because they’ve chosen to have lots of additional optional treatments, but rather because the clinic website cost doesn’t include lots of things that make up part of a normal treatment cycle, such as scans, blood tests, appointments with a consultant or sedation during egg collection.

If you are having treatment here in the UK, your clinic has to give you an individualised fully costed treatment plan before you start your cycle and this should include an estimate of everything you will have to pay. If you are having treatment overseas, there is no such requirement and additional costs can be an issue.  When considering a clinic,  the important question is what the clinic thinks you are likely to pay in total for your cycle rather than what the website suggests could be the cost of treatment.

New IVF exhibition at London’s Science Museum

 

Gallery views of “IVF: 6 Million Babies Later”. An exhibition marking the 40th anniversary of the ‘miraculous’ birth of Louise Brown on 25 July 1978. The exhibition explores the ten years of testing, hundreds of failed attempts and many setbacks faced by Robert Edwards, Patrick Steptoe and Jean Purdy, in their quest to treat infertility and achieve the first successful IVF birth.


This morning I went to London’s Science Museum for the opening of a special IVF-themed exhibition to mark the 40th anniversary of the birth of Louise Brown, the first IVF baby,.

Speaking at the launch of the exhibition – IVF: 6 Million Babies Later – Sally Cheshire CBE, Chair of the HFEA, paid tribute to the work of Professor Sir Robert Edwards, Dr Patrick Steptoe and Jean Purdy.

Sally said: “It is to these three people that we owe the most, for inventing in vitro fertilisation or IVF, persisting until it succeeded and allowing millions of patients to create their much longed-for families. Louise Brown’s birth 40 years ago was a defining moment in medicine and one that went on to have a huge impact on both the lives of individuals and society.”

The exhibition explores the remarkable story of IVF, from the opposition, uncertainty and challenges faced by the early pioneers, to the latest research in reproductive science today. Visitors will be able to see one of the ‘Oldham notebooks’, as they are known, that record the scientific data collected by Purdy and Edwards between 1969 and 1978, as well as examples of the equipment they used. Over 10 years, the notebooks recorded data for 282 anonymous women but only five pregnancies and two successful births.

The rest of the exhibition shows the worldwide media attention Louise’s birth brought to her family and what the future holds for scientific development and the millions of patients who experience fertility problems.

Sally adds: “There have been huge advancements in scientific research and medicine over the past 40 years and the UK remains at the forefront of scientific and clinical development in IVF. The 40th anniversary of Louise’s birth is a milestone and we can look forward to an exciting and challenging future as medicine and science allow more people to have the families they want.”

IVF: 6 Million Babies Later is free to visit and open daily from today until November 2018.

If you’ve had successful IVF treatment…

If you are based in or near London, you may be interested to know about a very special parents and babies group taking place on Wednesday lunchtime at the Bush Theatre as part of the amazing Fertility Fest. The Life and Lunch meeting is just for IVF parents and babies and is an opportunity to discuss candidly and confidentially, how it feels to become a parent after you’ve struggled to conceive. It is being facilitated by Saskia Boujo, Founder of My Beehive and creator of the ‘IVF and Proud’ merchandise brand; Helen Daviesauthor of More Love To Give about her story of secondary infertility; and Gabby Vautier, Co-Director of Fertility Fest and mum of IVF toddler twins.

I will also be there with five free copies of my book “Precious Babies – Pregnancy, Birth and Parenting after Infertility” to give away! Come and join us – it promises to be a fabulous session.

One or two embryos…

One discussion theme which comes up now and again on fertility websites and forums is whether to put back one embryo or two when you are having IVF, and there are always people advising others to “go for two” because it will double the chances of getting pregnant if you “don’t mind” having twins. For anyone who is struggling to conceive, the idea of twins can seem hugely attractive – an instant family in one go – but it’s important to be clear that multiple pregnancy is the biggest risk from IVF treatment for you and for your baby.

The best advice to anyone who is thinking about this as a dilemma is that you should be guided by the embryologists at your clinic, assuming you are having treatment here in the UK where your health and that of your babies is always put first when it comes to numbers of embryos to transfer. Most women should have one embryo put back, and two are only considered if you have had repeated unsuccessful attempts at IVF in the past, if you are older or if your embryos look less likely to implant. Putting two embryos back will not double your chances of getting pregnant. In fact, when  single embryo transfer is based on your embryologist’s advice, it should not reduce your chances of getting pregnant and if you would have got pregnant with twins, you will still get pregnant with one embryo. A multiple pregnancy is more likely to end in miscarriage but this is not always considered when people are making decisions about how many embryos to transfer.

Although we all know lots of twins who are flourishing and healthy, we don’t hear so much about those who aren’t. The increased risk of miscarriage, and of problems for the babies who are more likely to be born prematurely and may have disabilities or long term problems is very real. There are also risks for the mother such as high blood pressure and pre eclampsia and haemorrhage. You can read more about this here on the HFEA website.

This is why the best fertility clinics – those who really have your interests at heart – have a good success rate and a low multiple pregnancy rate.

Have you rated your fertility clinic?

If you’re having fertility treatment in the UK, or if you have done in the last year, have you given feedback on your experiences at the clinic? The body which regulates fertility clinics in the UK, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), is keen for patients to give their clinic a rating which you can do here on their website. This feedback is anonymous, and is used to give the clinic a patient rating on the HFEA website so that anyone considering having treatment at the clinic will know what other patients think about it.

You can also add any particular comments or views which are seen by the inspection team who go into the clinic to check how well it is working. This is incredibly important as it helps give inspectors a view of how the clinic is doing from a patient perspective and allows them to look into any particular areas of concern – or to notice where a clinic is doing particularly well.

If everyone took a few minutes to rate their clinic after having treatment it would help promote best practice and ensure that more fertility patients are cared for by compassionate staff, feel involved in discussions about how to progress their treatment and receive exceptional emotional support. So, there’s nothing to lose and everything to gain – if you haven’t done it already, here’s the link again to give feedback on your clinic.

Frozen embryo success

If you’re having fertility treatment, you may worry that using frozen embryos might reduce your chances of a successful pregnancy. Now, new research from Australia and Vietnam has found that your chances of getting pregnant are similar whether you use fresh or frozen embryos.

The researchers explained that previous studies have shown that for women who have PCOS, frozen embryo transfer leads to an increased chance of success so this research was focused on women who don’t have PCOS, and it found no difference in outcomes. The bottom line is that frozen embryo transfer can lead to the same success rates, and that putting back one embryo at a time is not only the safest way to have IVF, but will not reduce your chances of having a baby either.

The research is published in The New England Journal of Medicine, and you can read more details here and there’s an article on the subject with quotes from the researchers Dr Lan Vuong, from the University of Medicine and Pharmacy at Ho Chi Minh City, and Professor Ben Mol, from the University of Adelaide, here

IVF success rates

I’ve just been reading about an overseas clinic which claims an IVF success rate of more than 90% per IVF cycle started, including frozen embryo transfers. I could understand why this would seem an incredibly attractive prospect to anyone who needs fertility treatment – not only is IVF cheaper than it would be in the UK, it also appears to be far more successful. But is it? Does any clinic really have a success rate of 90%?

One of the main differences for the apparent discrepancies between outcomes at clinics here in the UK and the rates some overseas clinics claim is the way that they are presented. Here in the UK, you can check validated IVF outcomes on the HFEA website. These are accurate figures for live births over a set period. Some of the amazing rates you see on overseas clinic websites are not for live births but for positive pregnancy tests, and as we know that one in four pregnancies ends in miscarriage, it is not surprising that live birth rates are always lower than pregnancy rates.

The figures you get from the HFEA will also show you the outcomes for women of different ages. Birth rates after IVF in the UK range from  2% to 33% depending on the woman’s age. The HFEA figures show you outcomes over a set period – a specific year, or a three-year period. If you are running a clinic elsewhere and happen to have a month where you have very good outcomes and lots of women get pregnant, followed by a month where no one does, what’s stopping you from using your good month as your “success rate”?  So a success rate may be for a short period, for younger women and it may be pregnancy rather than live birth – and all of these things make a huge difference. What’s more, sometimes the figures are simply wrong. I’ve read some crazy claims for totally impossible success rates, particularly for older women using their own eggs. The truth is that IVF is less successful as we get older, and miscarriage presents a greater risk.

Many overseas clinics offer very good fertility services, but if you are thinking about treatment abroad do be careful about hyped figures and unrealistic claims about outcomes. Know what is likely and what is possible, and be wary of clinic websites claiming successes which are totally out of kilter with anything you’ve ever seen elsewhere, especially for successes for older women using their own eggs, as this may suggest a clinic which is prepared to be somewhat economical with the truth.

The cost of private fertility treatment

New research has found huge discrepancies in the prices people are charged for IVF and for many extras such as blood tests or drugs as reported here in the Times. It can be difficult if you need treatment as you don’t always feel you have time to shop around – but this shows that it is at least worth making a few calls to see whether anywhere closer to you may offer treatment at a lower price. If you do this though, you do need to make sure that the price isn’t lower because not everything is included in the cost you are being given  or because the treatment is not the same. It is also important to be aware that the headline costs on clinic websites often have little to do with the real costs that you will end up paying as a patient.

It’s not just the treatment itself where costs can differ but also the prices paid for any additional treatments which some patients are now considering. When I was looked into this, I was surprised at how big the differences were in the charges for add ons. For example, some clinics were including embryo glue in the cost of an IVF cycle whilst others were charging for it and the costs ranged from £75 to £350. It was a similar picture with endometrial scratch, which you might be able to get free at some clinics across the country by taking part in a clinical trial or which could cost you up to £450. I looked at a small sample of clinics and even in those, found these wide price discrepancies but it does show that it is worth at the very least asking why your clinic is charging what it does if it is much more than others.

Finally, don’t forget that the cost is one part of the equation. If you are having to travel a long distance to the clinic – or if it is overseas – this in itself adds costs both financial and in terms of stress. You will also want to check out the clinic details on the HFEA website to see the latest outcomes from treatment and to see how it is ranked by inspectors and other patients. There is a section in the patient ratings about cost which is particularly relevant as it shows whether people ended up paying more than they expected for treatment at that particular clinic so make sure you have at least considered these things before committing yourself.