New fertility group for South East London

I’m going to be running a new fertility group for Fertility Network in Greenwich in South East London which you are welcome to join! We are having our first meeting on the evening of Tuesday March 27. It will be great to see you if you are able to come along!

I first went to a group when I was going through IVF myself and found it hugely helpful to meet other people who understood how we felt. I was a bit uncertain about going along – I didn’t think I was the sort of person who went to group meetings – but in fact it wasn’t gloomy or depressing or any of the other things I’d expected. If anything, it was actually quite uplifting to be in a room full of people who weren’t going to stat asking questions about when we were going to have a baby and why we were leaving it so late…

I’ve run a number of different fertility groups over the years since then and have seen at first hand the benefits they can bring. So why not come along and join us and find out for yourselves…

You can join our brand new Facebook page to find out more or you can get in touch via the contact page here – and hope to see you on the 27th.

Fertility Education

Congratulations to the brilliant team at the Fertility Education Initiative for getting the subject of fertility education on the agenda. It was fabulous to see the subject covered on the front page of The Times, and also covered in the Sun and the Mail. The Fertility Education Initiative’s Jessica Hepburn and Professor Joyce Harper even featured on the Victoria Derbyshire show talking about this.

It’s such an easy subject to misunderstand or misinterpret – and people are often worried that talking to young people about infertility will mean they assume they don’t need to worry about contraception. In fact, this couldn’t be further from the truth as fertility education is about ensuring young people really understand and are fully informed about their own fertility. All too often, women who find they’ve left themselves a fairly small window of opportunity to conceive feel that they weren’t fully informed about their own reproductive clock or about the limits of fertility treatment.

You can read more about the Fertility Education Initiative here where you can also find answers to some common questions, and see a video of the Fertility Education Initiative’s Health Summit Choice Not Chance held in 2016.

Free IVF cycles

Since 2009, the Lister Fertility Clinic has been offering a small number of free IVF cycles each year to try to help people who are unable to access NHS-funded fertility treatment. The cycles are offered in conjunction with the charity Fertility Network UK and there are some criteria for entering into the draw for the free cycles.

You have to be a UK resident under the age of 42, with a cause for your fertility problems. Your BMI must be in the normal range and you can’t have any children from your current relationship. You can’t have been sterilised in the past and you can’t have had a free cycle at the Lister before. There are also some restrictions on the type of treatment you can have, which can’t include egg donation.

You need to send your entry to Fertility Network UK – and you can find the details here



Pineapples are much-discussed by those trying to conceive as their cores contain the enzyme bromelain, which is a natural anti-inflammatory which some believe could help implantation.

Now, the online fertility magazine ivfbabble is using pineapples as part of a campaign of solidarity for those experiencing fertility problems.  Their “stronger together” campaign is a brilliant idea which aims to bring people together and to make us all realise quite how common fertility problems and that we are not alone.

You can read more about the pineapple pins here –  and you can buy the pins directly on Amazon  or from ivfbabble and any profits from the sales will be donated to Fertility Network UK.


IVF funding situation is “shocking”

The latest figures released by Fertility Fairness earlier this week about funding for IVF treatment have been described as “shocking” by the President of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, Professor Lesley Regan.

Commenting on the fact that so few clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) are currently following national guidance and that the number which have completely removed NHS IVF has almost doubled in the last year, Professor Regan said “These figures are shocking and it’s very disappointing to see even fewer CCGs following NICE guidance and providing full access to NHS fertility treatment. Current access to treatment is a postcode lottery and these health inequalities people face are unacceptable. Infertility can have a devastating effect on people’s lives, causing distress, depression, and the breakdown of relationships. IVF treatment is cost-effective and should be available on the NHS. The RCOG is committed to working with UK commissioners and healthcare providers to support them in following NICE Fertility Guidelines.”

HFEA joins Facebook

You may want to have a look at – and follow – the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority’s new Facebook page. The HFEA regulates fertility treatment in the UK and is launching the page during National Fertility Awareness Week.

There are also a couple of very helpful videos on what it’s like to have IVF and ICSI. You can find out much more by having a look at the HFEA’s posts and you can follow for regular updates from the Authority.

Where are you in the IVF league tables?

The campaign group Fertility Fairness has produced a league table of different areas of the country to show how they rank when it comes to fertility treatment. Fertility Fairness has found that 90% of local clinical commissioning groups, who make the decisions about fertility treatment provision, found that nearly 90% were failing to provide the treatment that NICE has deemed to be both clinically effective and cost effective.

The BBC have provided a link to the full table in an article on the subject which shows that the best places to live if you need fertility treatment are Bury, Heywood, Middleton and Rochdale, Oldham and Tameside and Glossop. In some areas couples who are experiencing fertility problems cannot access any treatment. These are Basildon and Brentwood, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, Croydon, Herts Valleys, Mid Essex, North East Essex and South Norfolk.

Fertility Fairness Co-Chair Sarah Norcross has been doing media interviews this morning calling for the government to take urgent action about the current funding situation. The government has suggested that commissioners should follow NICE guidance but in practice many are still choosing to completely ignore the evidence about best practice and about cost-effectiveness leaving many patients unable to access treatment at all,

Living without children webinar

For anyone who is facing a future without children, there is a free webinar which may be of interest later this week. In support of National Fertility Awareness Week, Kelly Da Silva, who set up an online community called the Dovecot to support people who are living without children, will be running the webinar on Thursday 2nd November from 7pm – 8pm.
The topic will be ‘Dealing with Involuntary Childlessness’, and Kelly will be taking questions after an initial input in this topic where she will be discussing the key challenges of childlessness including, shame, disappointment & the impact of childlessness on our daily lives. You can find out more and details of how to join the free webinar on the Dovecot Instagram page here.

Infertility etiquette

We’ve all been there, the “helpful” comments and suggestions from friends and family – the detailed story about the friend of a friend of a friend who had five children after she forgot all about her fertility problems and decided to “just adopt” instead, or the information from a newspaper article they’ve half read about a new treatment, which when you dash off to read it yourself you find has actually only been tried out on mice in Brazil. You know the kind of thing…

They are trying to be kind and supportive, but knowing how best to help a friend or family member who is having fertility problems is hard unless you’ve been there yourself. It isn’t always easy to know what to say or how to say it. Sometimes people avoid the subject altogether because they are worried about getting it wrong, but others turn into fonts of wisdom offering advice and tips on every aspect of fertility which can be difficult to swallow  when you know they don’t really have a clue what they’re talking about. Pamela Tsigdinos, the author who has published widely on childlessness and infertility, has written this excellent blog post about infertility etiquette which you may want to pass on to your friends and family – she says exactly what you want to say, but may not always feel able to.

The politics of infertility

Fertility Network UK is inviting anyone facing fertility issues to an event at Westminster on 1 Nov from 4 – 6 pm to discuss fair funding for IVF.

Speakers include Peter Thompson from the HFEA, Paula Sherriff MP,  Rebecca Manson Jones (Candidate for Women’s Equality Party),  Geeta Nargund (Director of Create Fertility clinics) and patient campaigner Richard Clothier.

There are limited spaces for the event, and if you would like to attend you can find further details here