Your views needed!

If you are having fertility treatment, or have done recently, you may have been offered some additional extras on top of your IVF or ICSI. These additional treatments include things like time-lapse imaging, embryo glue, endometrial scratching or reproductive immunology. Not all clinics offer every type of additional treatment. Some may not suggest them at all, others include them in the price of IVF or you may be given the option to pay for add ons if you would like them.

Fertility Network UK, the patient charity, and the fertility regulator the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, or HFEA, is interested in finding out more about what you think about these add ons, how they should be offered and what you need in order to make decisions about whether to pay for them. Most of these add ons are not fully proven to increase your chance of getting pregnant.

If you have had treatment recently or are going through treatment currently, do take a minute to answer the short questionnaire to help them find out more about what your views are on this subject. You can find the link by clicking here

 

In praise of fertility nurses

Today is International Nurses’ Day, so I thought I’d dedicate this post to fertility nurses. When people think about different fertility clinics, there’s always a focus on the consultants when in fact although they are in charge of a patient’s care, they may do very little of the day-to-day care during a cycle of treatment. It’s often the consultants who attract patients to one clinic or another, and yet it may be the nurses who can make a real difference to how you feel during your fertility treatment.

Different clinics have different ways of working, but nurses may carry out scans and check bloods as well as doing much of the more practical dealing with fertility patients. More often than not, a fertility nurse will teach you how to do your injections, will talk to you about how you are feeling, will be there at the end of the phone as a first port of call for your questions or queries. It’s also the fertility nurses who may notice when you are finding it hard to cope and who may suggest a session with the clinic counsellor.

So today, let’s say thank you to the fertility nurses who do so much to help fertility patients but take so little of the credit…

Conceiving Histories

If you’re in or near London, there’s an event later this month which may be of interest presenting the work to date of a project called Conceiving Histories, which looks at what the researchers call “the history of un-pregnancy” – so trying to conceive and the politics of childlessness in the past as well as the ambiguity of early pregnancy diagnosis.

It is funded by Birkbeck, University of London and the Wellcome Trust and aims to identify and research case studies from different historical moments. At this particular event they will be looking at pregnancy diagnosis today and in the past.

It will take place on Wednesday 17 May and it is free to attend but you need to book – further details here.

Fertility buddies

What a brilliant idea from the Jewish Fertility Foundation reported in the Atlanta Jewish Times in the US to sponsor a training scheme for “fertility buddies”.  People who have been through fertility problems will be trained to provide support and guidance to others who are just starting out on their fertility journeys. The support system will include regular contact between the two to discuss feelings and problems that can arise.

The Jewish Fertility Foundation will carefully match the buddies, almost like a dating service match, to try to help ensure that the system works well. It’s such a brilliant idea – you can read more about it here. The Foundation also organises “infertility sensitivity training” for those working within the faith who may encounter people with fertility problems. Congratulations on two great initiatives which will make such a difference to those experiencing fertility problems.

“Twins” born years apart…

Every so often there’s an article like this one in today’s Guardian, about “twins” born years apart… The writer of this piece has a son and daughter born as a result of one fresh IVF cycle and a further frozen embryo transfer from the same batch of embryos.

It is a fortunate, yet far from uncommon, experience after fertility treatment, but it doesn’t make the children “twins”. Twins are two babies who are carried together and born at the same time, which these children were not. They are siblings rather than twins.

The Guardian seem to specialise in this myth – here are some previous twins who were born five years apart, although at least that time they called them “twins” in the headline…  Those were also covered by the Telegraph. And unsurprisingly the Daily Mail likes them too – these brothers born two years apart are “technically” twins according to the Mail – in fact, they are technically not twins. It is always made to sound as if it is some extraordinary and highly unusual matter, yet there are hundreds of thousands of siblings around the world who will have been conceived in a similar way.

Maybe I’m getting pedantic in my old age…

Congratulations Jessica!

I went to watch the London Marathon yesterday which I do every year as it passes near where I live. It’s always inspiring to see so many people who are doing such a remarkable thing to raise money for charities, often those close to their own hearts. This year, I was particularly hoping to cheer on Jessica Hepburn who was running to raise funds for Fertility Network UK – although I missed her in the crowds, I was able to keep track of her amazing run on the Marathon app. Jessica, who does so much fantastic work in this field, did so well and if you haven’t already, there is still time to sponsor her. The website for donating has been very busy so if you don’t get through right away, do go back later!

Running a marathon really is a huge feat, and so I wanted to congratulate not just the brilliant Jessica, but also my other marathon-running friends – running inspiration Sarah from Greenwich Runners, Liz and Patrick who crossed the finishing line together and the incredibly super speedy Dr Kate – well done to you all!

What do the abbreviations mean?

If you’ve been looking at fertility websites or forums (I think it should be “fora” but that sounds too weird), you may have been confused by the abbreviations…

They crop up throughout posts, and at first it can seem as if people are speaking an entirely different language when they talk about TTC (trying to conceive) and being on their 2ww (two week wait) hoping for a BFP (big fat positive – a positive pregnancy test).

Here is a brief guide to some common abbreviations for anyone who may a little help with translation…
A/F = Aunt Flo (period)
AH = Assisted hatching
AI = Artificial insemination
AIH = Artificial insemination by husband
AMH = Anti mullerian hormone
ART = Assisted reproductive technique
BBT = Basal body temperature
BFN = Big fat negative
BFP = Big fat positive
BICA = British Infertility Counselling Association
CD = Cycle day
DE = Donor eggs
DHEA = Dehydroepiandrosterone (a hormone which some believe can be beneficial for women with a low ovarian reserve)
DI = Donor insemination
DH = Darling husband
DPO = Days post ovulation
DPR = Days post retrieval
DP = Darling partner
DPT = Days post transfer
DS = Donor sperm
EC = Egg collection
ENDO = Endometriosis
ET = Embryo transfer
FER = Frozen embryo replacement
FET = Frozen embryo transfer
FP = Follicular phase
FSH = Follicle stimulating hormone
HCG = Human chorionic gonadotropin
HFEA = Human Fertilisation & Embryology Authority
HPT = Home pregnancy test
HRT = Hormone replacement therapy
HSC = Hysteroscopy
HSG = Hysterosalpingogram
ICSI = Intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection
IMHO = In my humble opinion
IMO = In my opinion
IUI = Intra-uterine insemination
IVF = In vitro fertilisation
IYKWIM = If you know what I mean
LAP = Laparoscopy
LH = Luteinising hormone
LMP = Last menstrual period
LP = Luteal phase
LPD = Luteal phase defect
M/C = Miscarriage
OI = Ovulation induction
OHSS = Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome
OPK = Ovulation predictor kit
PCOS = Polycystic ovary syndrome
PESA Percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration
PG = Pregnant
PI = Primary infertility
PID = Pelvic inflammatory disease
PMS = Pre-menstrual syndrome
POF = Premature ovarian failure
SI = Secondary infertility
TESA = Testicular sperm aspiration

And finally HTH (hope that helps)!

Running for the right to try

If you read this blog at all regularly, it won’t have escaped you that I am a huge fan of the brilliant Jessica Hepburn, Director of Fertility Fest and author of The Pursuit of Motherhood. You may have followed her Channel Swim to raise funds for Fertility Network UK, and now she’s doing it again with the London Marathon.

Jessica has written a fantastic blog post about this and if you want to read more about what she’s doing and why, you can find it here. There’s also a link to her JustGiving page where you can make a donation to support her through her 26 miles. For me, 10k feels like a marathon, and I think it’s a wonderful thing that she is doing – so support her if you possibly can and help to make it even more worthwhile.

Fertility Day of Action

If you’re concerned by the postcode lottery for fertility treatment, you can join the Fertility Network UK Day of Action on 25 March. You don’t have to go out marching anywhere, but just a few small actions can make all the difference

There are three ways you can join in –

  • Contact your MP, Tell them how the postcode lottery is affecting you and what is happening in your local area. You can find out more about how to find your MP’s contact details and what you might want to say in an email or letter here on the Fertility Network UK website.
  • You can tweet your support using the hashtags #IVFx3 #tellyourMP #righttotry
  • You can help create a fertility funding Thunderclap – a social media message sent collectively – on Facebook, Twitter and tumblr on Saturday 25 March at 3pm. Register your support for the Thunderclap at https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/52716-the-right-to-try-campaign

Fertility guidelines from the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) say that if you should be able to access 3 full cycles of NHS IVF if you under 40 and eligible for treatment, An overwhelming 98 per cent of England’s 209 local clinical commissioning groups (CCGS) do not follow this guidance fully and have either cut the number of IVF cycles they offer and ration services by introducing additional non-medical access criteria, such as denying IVF to individuals if their partner has a child from a previous relationship.

Do join in and help your charity to help you to make a difference!

 

Clean eating and your fertility

I know from running support groups that there’s a lot of interest in the idea of ‘clean eating’ and fertility – and the recent Fertility Network UK patient survey showed that 75% of respondents had changed their diets because of their fertility problems.

Of course, it makes sense to eat healthily if you are having difficulty getting pregnant or going through treatment – it is good for you, it makes you feel better about yourself and you really wouldn’t want to be living on beer and chips. However, so many fertility patients I see are on diets that can start to feel incredibly restrictive, and that may not be a good thing.

I always remember interviewing someone who’d been following a strict diet for her fertility who said she suddenly realised it was making her really miserable and dominating her life. She concluded that actually being happy was probably more important than not ever eating a biscuit or drinking a cup of tea (builders as opposed to herbal of course).

I think she was absolutely right. There is nothing worse than feeling constantly guilty. I have seen people who end up blaming themselves for their fertility problems because they like ice cream or having a glass of wine when they are out with friends. These things in moderation are really not going to stop you getting pregnant. This article from The Spectator may be of interest!