Pregnancy test recall

A false positive from a pregnancy test is the nightmare of anyone who has been through fertility treatment, but more than 58,000 digital pregnancy tests called Clear & Simple have been recalled after it became apparent that the test had mistakenly told some women they were pregnant when in fact they weren’t.

If you have bought a Clear & Simple test, manufactured by Guangzhou Wondfo Biotech, you should return it if it is from the potentially faulty batch. You can check the lot number on the inside and outside of the package – it is Lot Number DM10220170710E with an expert date of January 2020 which is affected.

The manufacturers stress that only a small number of problems have arisen with the tests and that they have been removed from shops already, but if you do have a test from this batch, you should return it and anyone who has had a false positive result from these tests should report it.

Scream4IVF

I am sure you will all be aware of Fertility Network UK’s Scream4IVF campaign, aimed at ending the postcode lottery for IVF treatment. If you haven’t signed the petition yet which calls for a parliamentary debate on the subject you can do so here. The charity has been asking people to donate their scream on social media to give a voice to people with fertility problems and allow their frustrations to be aired. The screams will be collated to form the world’s longest scream for IVF to be played at a rally outside Westminster. The charity is encouraging people to join them at at the rally which takes place at Richmond Terrace at Westminster on October 10th from 5pm to 7pm.

Have you had fertility treatment in the last 5 years?

If you have had fertility treatment in the UK in the last five years, would you be willing to help identify key areas for improvement to ensure everyone receives high-quality care in the future?

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) which regulates fertility clinics in the UK has launched a national fertility patient survey and your views are vital to help the Authority understand experiences of treatment. The survey is being run by YouGov, and the more people that take part, the clearer the views and the greater the impact.

This is an excellent opportunity to help other people going through fertility treatment by giving the information and opinions the HFEA needs to help ensure these are taken into consideration in the future. The survey takes about 15 minutes to complete, and the link is here.

Scream for IVF!

The patient charity Fertility Network UK has launched a new campaign today called Scream 4 IVF which aims to raise awareness of the unfairness of the postcode lottery for fertility treatment. Currently a majority of those who need fertility treatment end up paying for themselves, and local commissioners who decide how to spend NHS funds are often ignoring the guidance from NICE on this and rationing fertility treatment.

The new campaign asks you to upload yourself screaming on social media with the #Scream4IVF and link to the petition bit.ly/Scream4IVF to call for a debate in parliament on fertility funding. Of course, you also need to sign it yourself!

Please, do support this important work – if you don’t want to scream, just sign – whatever you can do will help. You can find the campaign website at https://www.scream4ivf.org

Could you help to direct the future of fertility research

If you have personal experience of fertility problems, could you help with a project which aims to discover what you really want and need from fertility research?  A group supported by the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group and the University of Oxford is bringing together people with fertility problems, healthcare professionals, and researchers to try to establish the top ten questions that they want future research projects to answer.  You can take part in this by answering some questions in a couple of short surveys that the researchers estimate will take no more than ten minutes to complete.

This is really important work as it will help ensure that future research focuses on what you want and need to know to help you to make informed choices – so do find a spare ten minutes for this if you possibly can!

There are more details and a link to the survey here

The cost of IVF

When you’re thinking about having IVF and looking at different clinics, the logical place to start is clinic websites – but it is increasingly apparent that when it comes to the cost of a cycle of treatment, that might not be as helpful as it should be. The headline prices for IVF on clinic websites have always been lower than the price patients pay as they rarely include the drugs used during a treatment cycle which adds considerably to the bill. Recently, however, I’ve spoken to a number of patients who have paid up to twice as much as the price their clinic websites have suggested a cycle costs. That’s not because they’ve chosen to have lots of additional optional treatments, but rather because the clinic website cost doesn’t include lots of things that make up part of a normal treatment cycle, such as scans, blood tests, appointments with a consultant or sedation during egg collection.

If you are having treatment here in the UK, your clinic has to give you an individualised fully costed treatment plan before you start your cycle and this should include an estimate of everything you will have to pay. If you are having treatment overseas, there is no such requirement and additional costs can be an issue.  When considering a clinic,  the important question is what the clinic thinks you are likely to pay in total for your cycle rather than what the website suggests could be the cost of treatment.

If you’ve had successful IVF treatment…

If you are based in or near London, you may be interested to know about a very special parents and babies group taking place on Wednesday lunchtime at the Bush Theatre as part of the amazing Fertility Fest. The Life and Lunch meeting is just for IVF parents and babies and is an opportunity to discuss candidly and confidentially, how it feels to become a parent after you’ve struggled to conceive. It is being facilitated by Saskia Boujo, Founder of My Beehive and creator of the ‘IVF and Proud’ merchandise brand; Helen Daviesauthor of More Love To Give about her story of secondary infertility; and Gabby Vautier, Co-Director of Fertility Fest and mum of IVF toddler twins.

I will also be there with five free copies of my book “Precious Babies – Pregnancy, Birth and Parenting after Infertility” to give away! Come and join us – it promises to be a fabulous session.

Thinking of having treatment overseas?

If you are considering going abroad for fertility treatment, you may be interested in this article I wrote for a supplement for The Times earlier this week.

For many people, going overseas can be a cheaper option, and many return with positive stories about their experiences, but you do need to be aware of the facts and understand the differences you may find if you choose to have treatment outside the UK.

There are some great clinics across the globe, but there are also some that are not quite so great and you don’t have the protection that you have here in the UK of knowing that all  clinics offering IVF are licensed and regularly inspected by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority. As you don’t have that luxury with clinics elsewhere, you do need to make sure you do your homework and research as much as you can about the clinic and the country to ensure that you are left feeling that you did the right thing in choosing to travel for treatment.

Just relax…

For anyone with any experience at all of fertility problems, there’s a general understanding that probably the worst thing someone can say to you is “just relax…”, and yet this is the advice a TV doctor gave on ITV’s Lorraine programme. Dr Hilary Jones apparently said to a caller who was asking for advice after three unsuccessful rounds of IVF;  “What I would say is, and this is probably the hardest thing to do, is just relax about it. There have been so many people that I’ve known who’ve gone through several rounds of IVF and nothing happens. And when they’ve given up, and gotten on with their lives, it miraculously happens naturally… Sometimes stress itself can have a very negative effect. So try living your life as normally as you can.”

I suppose this just shows why you should stick to asking fertility specialists for advice rather than a TV doctor, but there has been an understandable backlash from fertility patients and the charity Fertility Network UK. There is certainly a lesson to be learned for TV producers about the risks of getting a GP, who is by nature a generalist rather than a specialist, to offer advice to those who have already been treated by experts in any field of medicine. But should any doctor, even if they are a GP rather than a specialist, be telling people to “just relax” or suggesting that stress might be to blame for infertility? Apart from anything else, we all know that fertility problems cause huge amounts of stress – and that telling someone who is trying to conceive to “just relax” is about as helpful as telling them to get a dog, go on holiday or any of the other helpful advice that non-experts in the field like to pass on.

There is another problem here though, and that’s to do with blame. Suggesting that your stress levels might be responsible for your blocked fallopian tubes or endometriosis is nonsense, and yet many people do end up feeling that it’s their fault they can’t conceive in a culture which encourages you to believe that you can make the difference to outcomes by thinking positive, clean eating or complementary therapies. The truth is that none of these things are going to unblock your tubes or get rid of endometriosis, and for a medical professional to suggest that getting pregnant might miraculously happen naturally if you just relax is quite bizarre.

Even the response has been interesting, with Woman & Home covering the issue with a headline “Lorraine’s Dr Hilary faces backlash following ‘insensitive’ comments during IVF discussion’. They were not ‘insensitive’ comments but insensitive comments – and that’s the understanding that we still need to change!

New fertility group for South East London

I’m going to be running a new fertility group for Fertility Network in Greenwich in South East London which you are welcome to join! We are having our first meeting on the evening of Tuesday March 27. It will be great to see you if you are able to come along!

I first went to a group when I was going through IVF myself and found it hugely helpful to meet other people who understood how we felt. I was a bit uncertain about going along – I didn’t think I was the sort of person who went to group meetings – but in fact it wasn’t gloomy or depressing or any of the other things I’d expected. If anything, it was actually quite uplifting to be in a room full of people who weren’t going to stat asking questions about when we were going to have a baby and why we were leaving it so late…

I’ve run a number of different fertility groups over the years since then and have seen at first hand the benefits they can bring. So why not come along and join us and find out for yourselves…

You can join our brand new Facebook page to find out more or you can get in touch via the contact page here – and hope to see you on the 27th.