Can you be happy if IVF doesn’t work?

It’s one of those things people don’t even want to think about when they’re going through fertility treatment – what might happen if it didn’t work, ever? Could you really be happy if you didn’t end up with a baby? What would you do if all that time, effort, money and emotional investment led to nothing? Would your life ever feel fulfilled and enjoyable? Could the overwhelming sadness go away? I want to tell you about someone who is a brilliant example of the fact that life after IVF treatment can be both fulfilled and enjoyable. She’s called Lesley Pyne, and I first met her when I was a trustee for the charity which is now Fertility Network UK. Lesley was one of my fellow trustees, and had joined as she was involved with the section of the charity for people who were involuntarily childless known at the time as More to Life.

Today, I met Lesley for the first time for a while and it struck me that she looked about 10 years younger than she did when I last first knew her – which means she must look about 20 years younger than she really is! Her eyes were bright and shining, and her zest for life was almost palpable. Lesley, who always seemed to be making an effort not to stand out when we were fellow trustees, was dressed in bright colours with electric blue nails.  She is happy, she is making the most of the good things in her life – and she has just written a book explaining how she went from feeling devastated by unsuccessful treatment to this confident, happy woman who gets the best out of her life – it’s due to be published in June and is called Finding Joy Beyond Childlessness.

It strikes me as we talk that Lesley has embraced something we could all learn from – living for the moment, focusing on the positives and making an effort to enjoy what we have. I haven’t read Finding Joy Beyond Childlessness yet – but she explained that it contains her story and those of a number of other women who have come out the other side of involuntary childlessness to find fulfilment. She says it is a journey,  and it can be hard along the way, but that there is life beyond childlessness, there is more to life – and if you need help along that path, keep an eye out for Lesley’s book when it comes out in June.

Making Friends with your Fertility

If you’re looking for a book to support you through your fertility journey, then Making Friends with your Fertility written by specialist fertility counsellor Tracey Sainsbury along with co-author Sarah Rayner may be just what you’re looking for. It contains all the basics you need to know about fertility and treatment but what’s so good about this book is that it is written by someone who really knows how it feels and who understands the difficulties you are likely to face along the way.

I remember having lunch with Tracey some while back now when she told me she was thinking of writing a book. I knew right away that it would be the kind of book fertility patients would welcome, as Tracey is not just a fertility counsellor working in fertility clinics, she also has personal experience of fertility problems, and worked for the charity Fertility Network UK for years. She has known fertility patients as a peer, as a professional and as a support worker and she has a unique perspective on the journey.

So many books about fertility are packed with advice about how to improve your chances of successful treatment through positive thinking. At one level, it may seem helpful to talk about relaxation but what I love about Making Friends with your Fertility is that Tracey appreciates that experiencing fertility problems and going through treatment can be traumatic, and that feeling stressed is a perfectly normal reaction to this. Tracey’s book won’t tell you to “just relax” or to “think yourself pregnant”, but will rather support you to stop blaming yourself for how you feel.

I think Making Friends with your Fertility is a bit like having your own personal fertility counsellor at hand to turn to whenever you need support along the way. There’s a lot here about how you might feel emotionally and how to handle that – and it’s sensible advice. If you want a fertility book that is going to support you along the way, rather than set you impossible challenges, then Making Friends with your Fertility is one to recommend!

New fertility group for South East London

I’m going to be running a new fertility group for Fertility Network in Greenwich in South East London which you are welcome to join! We are having our first meeting on the evening of Tuesday March 27. It will be great to see you if you are able to come along!

I first went to a group when I was going through IVF myself and found it hugely helpful to meet other people who understood how we felt. I was a bit uncertain about going along – I didn’t think I was the sort of person who went to group meetings – but in fact it wasn’t gloomy or depressing or any of the other things I’d expected. If anything, it was actually quite uplifting to be in a room full of people who weren’t going to stat asking questions about when we were going to have a baby and why we were leaving it so late…

I’ve run a number of different fertility groups over the years since then and have seen at first hand the benefits they can bring. So why not come along and join us and find out for yourselves…

You can join our brand new Facebook page to find out more or you can get in touch via the contact page here – and hope to see you on the 27th.

Fertility Fest 2018

It was great to be at the launch of Fertility Fest 2018 this morning, the fertility arts festival organised by Jessica Hepburn and Gabby Vautier-Farr. We were treated to inspiring words from Jessica and Gabby and an exciting extract of the sort of thing we can expect to enjoy during the festival. You can see the line-up for this year’s festival on the website – www.fertilityfest.com and you can buy tickets now too. I’m already really excited about this year’s festival – there are some amazing artists and expert and fascinating discussions. Make sure you get a ticket before they all sell out – and I hope to see you there!

Preventing cervical cancer.

It’s Cervical Cancer Prevention Week, and if you’re due a smear test, make sure you make an appointment now! Women who are trying to get pregnant still need to have regular smear tests, and if you’re worried about it clashing with treatment, discuss this with a healthcare professional. Screening is so important because it can help to protect you from cervical cancer, as can making sure you know about the symptoms and by seeking medical help if you experience these. The symptoms of cervical cancer may include abnormal bleeding between periods or after intercourse, unusual vaginal discharge, discomfort or pain during intercourse and lower back pain.

Around 3,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer every year in the UK, and it’s the most common cancer in women who are under 36. The vast majority of cervical cancers are caused by infections with a virus called high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is an extremely common virus and it is passed from one person to another through skin to skin contact in the genital area. About 80% of sexually active adults are infected with some type of HPV at some time in their lives but for most of them this won’t lead to cancer.

You can find lots of useful information about every aspect of cervical cancer on the Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust website.

The IVF diary

If you haven’t seen the final episode of Hannah and Lewis Vaughan-Jones’ video diary of their IVF journey, you can find it here on YouTube. It made me cry, and I think Hannah and Lewis are incredibly brave to have been so open about their experiences – not only is it heartening to anyone going through fertility problems themselves, it’s also hugely helpful to friends, families and colleagues to give them an insight into the reality of treatment. All too often people dismiss infertility as some kind of selfish 21st century indulgence – mostly, of course, those who’ve managed to conceive without any trouble themselves. By being so honest, Hannah and Lewis have given a vivid illustration of the very real pain and suffering that is all too familiar to the one in seven of us who have personal experience of fertility problems.

So thank you to Hannah and Lewis for doing this and for telling your story on behalf of us all. It is not an easy path to take, but perhaps there is some solace in knowing how much you have helped so many other people – and very best wishes for the future.

Feeling fed up with January?

If you’re fed up with people DOING things for January – whether it’s Dry January, joining a spin class or taking up tap dancing – you may like to read Lesley Pyne’s latest blog post. I’ve known Lesley for a long time and have witnessed her building up her support network to help other people who are experiencing involuntary childlessness – she offers lots of support and inspiration for anyone living without children, and has helped many people through their own difficult times. You can sign up for regular emails from Lesley which offer tips and advice. What’s more, she’s right about January and people doing things – it can be exhausting to be faced with other people’s bouncy enthusiasm when you’re just trying to get through things yourself.

I didn’t make any new year’s resolutions this year – I’ve come to the conclusion that if you try to give things up, you just feel more focused on them and have a sense of being deprived when you can’t have them. And when you don’t feel you HAVE to go to the gym or go running, it can make exercise seem much more attractive.  I know it may be my strange logic, but it works for me…

The cost of private fertility treatment

New research has found huge discrepancies in the prices people are charged for IVF and for many extras such as blood tests or drugs as reported here in the Times. It can be difficult if you need treatment as you don’t always feel you have time to shop around – but this shows that it is at least worth making a few calls to see whether anywhere closer to you may offer treatment at a lower price. If you do this though, you do need to make sure that the price isn’t lower because not everything is included in the cost you are being given  or because the treatment is not the same. It is also important to be aware that the headline costs on clinic websites often have little to do with the real costs that you will end up paying as a patient.

It’s not just the treatment itself where costs can differ but also the prices paid for any additional treatments which some patients are now considering. When I was looked into this, I was surprised at how big the differences were in the charges for add ons. For example, some clinics were including embryo glue in the cost of an IVF cycle whilst others were charging for it and the costs ranged from £75 to £350. It was a similar picture with endometrial scratch, which you might be able to get free at some clinics across the country by taking part in a clinical trial or which could cost you up to £450. I looked at a small sample of clinics and even in those, found these wide price discrepancies but it does show that it is worth at the very least asking why your clinic is charging what it does if it is much more than others.

Finally, don’t forget that the cost is one part of the equation. If you are having to travel a long distance to the clinic – or if it is overseas – this in itself adds costs both financial and in terms of stress. You will also want to check out the clinic details on the HFEA website to see the latest outcomes from treatment and to see how it is ranked by inspectors and other patients. There is a section in the patient ratings about cost which is particularly relevant as it shows whether people ended up paying more than they expected for treatment at that particular clinic so make sure you have at least considered these things before committing yourself.

Getting the balance right

Happy New Year everyone – and welcome to 2018. I hope it is a successful and happy year for you all, and that you can strike a balance between doing all you can to help yourself with your fertility problems and making life start to be difficult and miserable.

It may sound odd, but anyone trying to conceive is keen to do all that they can to make a difference to the outcome of treatment and there are many things you can do which are entirely sensible and likely to be beneficial – eating healthily, taking exercise, trying to take care of yourself as much as you can. What is not so likely to be beneficial is making strict rules for yourself which are incredibly difficult to follow and leaving yourself feeling constantly guilty if you don’t quite meet the mark – and then blaming yourself for your fertility problems. I’ve seen so many people recently who are following strict dietary rules and other guidance from therapists and complementary practitioners which can make life start to feel like a military exercise – and it really can start to become counterproductive if it is making you stressed. The truth is that being overweight, eating unhealthily and drinking too much alcohol can affect your fertility, but an occasional glass of wine or piece of chocolate is really not going to ruin your chances of fertility treatment working.

So for 2018, be kind to yourself – try to be as healthy as you can, but don’t forget to think about what makes you happy too!

Happy New Year

Thank you to everyone who has read the Fertility Matters blog over the past year – it has been great to have so much interest and I wanted to wish you all a very Happy New Year.

I know that when you are trying to conceive the start of a new year can feel tainted with the sadness of another year passing when you haven’t managed to conceive – and another year when the number of friends and family members who don’t have children seems to have dwindled even further after having to deal with endless pregnancy announcements and putting on a cheerful face.  It’s better – if not always easy – to try to put that behind you on Dec 31st and to look forward to the year ahead, to see it as a fresh start with new challenges but possibly new happinesses too.

If you are thinking of making new year’s resolutions, don’t set yourself difficult targets that you will struggle to reach – perhaps think more about being kinder to yourself, looking after yourself and focusing on doing more of the things in life which make you happy. They so often disappear when you’re trying to conceive and all you can focus on is that one seemingly unattainable thing – but try to think about the things that you enjoy and make sure you do more of them whatever they may be from walks in the country to going to the cinema. Set yourself some dates to look forward to in your diary – book something you know you’ll enjoy and you can give that some focus. Whatever it is you’re planning, take care of yourself and have fun!