The cost of private fertility treatment

New research has found huge discrepancies in the prices people are charged for IVF and for many extras such as blood tests or drugs as reported here in the Times. It can be difficult if you need treatment as you don’t always feel you have time to shop around – but this shows that it is at least worth making a few calls to see whether anywhere closer to you may offer treatment at a lower price. If you do this though, you do need to make sure that the price isn’t lower because not everything is included in the cost you are being given  or because the treatment is not the same. It is also important to be aware that the headline costs on clinic websites often have little to do with the real costs that you will end up paying as a patient.

It’s not just the treatment itself where costs can differ but also the prices paid for any additional treatments which some patients are now considering. When I was looked into this, I was surprised at how big the differences were in the charges for add ons. For example, some clinics were including embryo glue in the cost of an IVF cycle whilst others were charging for it and the costs ranged from £75 to £350. It was a similar picture with endometrial scratch, which you might be able to get free at some clinics across the country by taking part in a clinical trial or which could cost you up to £450. I looked at a small sample of clinics and even in those, found these wide price discrepancies but it does show that it is worth at the very least asking why your clinic is charging what it does if it is much more than others.

Finally, don’t forget that the cost is one part of the equation. If you are having to travel a long distance to the clinic – or if it is overseas – this in itself adds costs both financial and in terms of stress. You will also want to check out the clinic details on the HFEA website to see the latest outcomes from treatment and to see how it is ranked by inspectors and other patients. There is a section in the patient ratings about cost which is particularly relevant as it shows whether people ended up paying more than they expected for treatment at that particular clinic so make sure you have at least considered these things before committing yourself.

Getting the balance right

Happy New Year everyone – and welcome to 2018. I hope it is a successful and happy year for you all, and that you can strike a balance between doing all you can to help yourself with your fertility problems and making life start to be difficult and miserable.

It may sound odd, but anyone trying to conceive is keen to do all that they can to make a difference to the outcome of treatment and there are many things you can do which are entirely sensible and likely to be beneficial – eating healthily, taking exercise, trying to take care of yourself as much as you can. What is not so likely to be beneficial is making strict rules for yourself which are incredibly difficult to follow and leaving yourself feeling constantly guilty if you don’t quite meet the mark – and then blaming yourself for your fertility problems. I’ve seen so many people recently who are following strict dietary rules and other guidance from therapists and complementary practitioners which can make life start to feel like a military exercise – and it really can start to become counterproductive if it is making you stressed. The truth is that being overweight, eating unhealthily and drinking too much alcohol can affect your fertility, but an occasional glass of wine or piece of chocolate is really not going to ruin your chances of fertility treatment working.

So for 2018, be kind to yourself – try to be as healthy as you can, but don’t forget to think about what makes you happy too!

Happy New Year

Thank you to everyone who has read the Fertility Matters blog over the past year – it has been great to have so much interest and I wanted to wish you all a very Happy New Year.

I know that when you are trying to conceive the start of a new year can feel tainted with the sadness of another year passing when you haven’t managed to conceive – and another year when the number of friends and family members who don’t have children seems to have dwindled even further after having to deal with endless pregnancy announcements and putting on a cheerful face.  It’s better – if not always easy – to try to put that behind you on Dec 31st and to look forward to the year ahead, to see it as a fresh start with new challenges but possibly new happinesses too.

If you are thinking of making new year’s resolutions, don’t set yourself difficult targets that you will struggle to reach – perhaps think more about being kinder to yourself, looking after yourself and focusing on doing more of the things in life which make you happy. They so often disappear when you’re trying to conceive and all you can focus on is that one seemingly unattainable thing – but try to think about the things that you enjoy and make sure you do more of them whatever they may be from walks in the country to going to the cinema. Set yourself some dates to look forward to in your diary – book something you know you’ll enjoy and you can give that some focus. Whatever it is you’re planning, take care of yourself and have fun!

Goodbye to Juliet

I don’t often put personal posts on this blog, but today I did want to say thank you to Juliet Tizzard who is leaving her role as Director of Strategy and Corporate Affairs at the regulatory body for fertility treatment, the HFEA.  If you’ve been to the Fertility Show in the past, you may have seen Juliet speaking there about how the Choose a Fertility Clinic pages on the HFEA website can help if you are trying to decide where to have treatment. She’s driven some of the exciting steps forward for the HFEA such as the new website where patients can find lots of helpful information about different clinics and can give feedback after they’ve had treatment. Juliet is moving on today to the Health Research Authority where she will do a fantastic job – but she will be missed!

Join us to talk about coping at Christmas

 

If you’d like to join us for the Fertility Network UK online chat via Skype on Wednesday 13th December at 7pm, we will be discussing Christmas. It’s always a hard time for anyone who is experiencing fertility problems, and we’ll be talking about some strategies which can help with a Q and A session at the end.

You can find the details of how to join on the Fertility Network UK website.

Pineapples…

Pineapples are much-discussed by those trying to conceive as their cores contain the enzyme bromelain, which is a natural anti-inflammatory which some believe could help implantation.

Now, the online fertility magazine ivfbabble is using pineapples as part of a campaign of solidarity for those experiencing fertility problems.  Their “stronger together” campaign is a brilliant idea which aims to bring people together and to make us all realise quite how common fertility problems and that we are not alone.

You can read more about the pineapple pins here – www.ivfbabble.com  and you can buy the pins directly on Amazon  or from ivfbabble and any profits from the sales will be donated to Fertility Network UK.

 

Sophie’s story

If you listened to BBC reporter Sophie Sulehria’s first broadcast about her fertility journey on Radio Four, you can find all the episodes she’s put together so far here. 

There’s Sophie’s own story which she tells in two episodes with her husband Jonny, along with reports on adoption and egg donation where Sophie talks to people who have experience of these other routes to parenthood.  The series is due to run into the new year, so there’s more to come from Sophie and Jonny.

Do listen – it’s great to hear someone who actually understands what it’s like and who has personal experience talking about these subjects. And thanks to Sophie and Jonny for their courage in being so open about their own story – fertility is not an easy thing to talk about when you are still on the journey.

Coping with Christmas

It’s often the worst possible time of the year for anyone trying to conceive – you just can’t seem to escape perfect smiling families wherever you turn whether it’s adverts on television or displays in shop windows. It can feel a very hard and lonely time to be childless when the very point of Christmas is to celebrate a birth.

There is no shortage of advice about how to get through this time of year. I usually write a blog post about it, but this year I thought maybe I’d give you a collection of other people’s thoughts on the subject to browse.

Here on netdoctor are the views of Harley Street fertility specialist Dr Geeta Venkat, here are some thoughts from Lesley Pyne who specialises in supporting women who are childless, some musings in the Daily Mail from Amanda Platell, thoughts from the Childless by Marriage blog, and a great factsheet on the subject from the US fertility support charity Resolve.

I hope that some of these are helpful – there are certainly lots of ideas and the key theme seems to be to put yourself first, not to attend events you know are going to be difficult just because you feel you should and to try to create a different Christmas for yourself doing the things that you like.

HFEA joins Facebook

You may want to have a look at – and follow – the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority’s new Facebook page. The HFEA regulates fertility treatment in the UK and is launching the page during National Fertility Awareness Week.

There are also a couple of very helpful videos on what it’s like to have IVF and ICSI. You can find out much more by having a look at the HFEA’s posts and you can follow for regular updates from the Authority.

Infertility etiquette

We’ve all been there, the “helpful” comments and suggestions from friends and family – the detailed story about the friend of a friend of a friend who had five children after she forgot all about her fertility problems and decided to “just adopt” instead, or the information from a newspaper article they’ve half read about a new treatment, which when you dash off to read it yourself you find has actually only been tried out on mice in Brazil. You know the kind of thing…

They are trying to be kind and supportive, but knowing how best to help a friend or family member who is having fertility problems is hard unless you’ve been there yourself. It isn’t always easy to know what to say or how to say it. Sometimes people avoid the subject altogether because they are worried about getting it wrong, but others turn into fonts of wisdom offering advice and tips on every aspect of fertility which can be difficult to swallow  when you know they don’t really have a clue what they’re talking about. Pamela Tsigdinos, the author who has published widely on childlessness and infertility, has written this excellent blog post about infertility etiquette which you may want to pass on to your friends and family – she says exactly what you want to say, but may not always feel able to.