Pregnancy test recall

A false positive from a pregnancy test is the nightmare of anyone who has been through fertility treatment, but more than 58,000 digital pregnancy tests called Clear & Simple have been recalled after it became apparent that the test had mistakenly told some women they were pregnant when in fact they weren’t.

If you have bought a Clear & Simple test, manufactured by Guangzhou Wondfo Biotech, you should return it if it is from the potentially faulty batch. You can check the lot number on the inside and outside of the package – it is Lot Number DM10220170710E with an expert date of January 2020 which is affected.

The manufacturers stress that only a small number of problems have arisen with the tests and that they have been removed from shops already, but if you do have a test from this batch, you should return it and anyone who has had a false positive result from these tests should report it.

Scream4IVF

I am sure you will all be aware of Fertility Network UK’s Scream4IVF campaign, aimed at ending the postcode lottery for IVF treatment. If you haven’t signed the petition yet which calls for a parliamentary debate on the subject you can do so here. The charity has been asking people to donate their scream on social media to give a voice to people with fertility problems and allow their frustrations to be aired. The screams will be collated to form the world’s longest scream for IVF to be played at a rally outside Westminster. The charity is encouraging people to join them at at the rally which takes place at Richmond Terrace at Westminster on October 10th from 5pm to 7pm.

Music to support fertility charities

If you are in London on September 29, why not take the opportunity to attend a concert to help raise funds for two fantastic charities, the Donor Conception Network and the Daisy Network.

Taking place in St Mary’s Church in Rotherhithe, the  concert is with Dunajska Kapelye, a trio who play beautiful gypsy and Eastern European music and are led by one of London’s most respected violinists, Polish Piotr Jordan. The concert will feature plaintive Gypsy ballads, tub-thumping Romanian wedding dances, elements of tango and klezmer. It promises to be a wonderful evening – and great to be able to be raising money to support such important charities with their work at the same time.

You can find more information on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/events/710467139299822  and you can buy tickets here  http://tunedin.london/tunedin.php

Have you had fertility treatment in the last 5 years?

If you have had fertility treatment in the UK in the last five years, would you be willing to help identify key areas for improvement to ensure everyone receives high-quality care in the future?

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) which regulates fertility clinics in the UK has launched a national fertility patient survey and your views are vital to help the Authority understand experiences of treatment. The survey is being run by YouGov, and the more people that take part, the clearer the views and the greater the impact.

This is an excellent opportunity to help other people going through fertility treatment by giving the information and opinions the HFEA needs to help ensure these are taken into consideration in the future. The survey takes about 15 minutes to complete, and the link is here.

Scream for IVF!

The patient charity Fertility Network UK has launched a new campaign today called Scream 4 IVF which aims to raise awareness of the unfairness of the postcode lottery for fertility treatment. Currently a majority of those who need fertility treatment end up paying for themselves, and local commissioners who decide how to spend NHS funds are often ignoring the guidance from NICE on this and rationing fertility treatment.

The new campaign asks you to upload yourself screaming on social media with the #Scream4IVF and link to the petition bit.ly/Scream4IVF to call for a debate in parliament on fertility funding. Of course, you also need to sign it yourself!

Please, do support this important work – if you don’t want to scream, just sign – whatever you can do will help. You can find the campaign website at https://www.scream4ivf.org

Could you help to direct the future of fertility research

If you have personal experience of fertility problems, could you help with a project which aims to discover what you really want and need from fertility research?  A group supported by the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group and the University of Oxford is bringing together people with fertility problems, healthcare professionals, and researchers to try to establish the top ten questions that they want future research projects to answer.  You can take part in this by answering some questions in a couple of short surveys that the researchers estimate will take no more than ten minutes to complete.

This is really important work as it will help ensure that future research focuses on what you want and need to know to help you to make informed choices – so do find a spare ten minutes for this if you possibly can!

There are more details and a link to the survey here

Could you be a lay examiner?

The Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists (RCOG) exams department is recruiting a new pool of Lay Examiners. The Membership Exam (MRCOG), for hospital doctors wishing to specialise in obstetrics and gynaecology, consists of a Part 1 written examination, Part 2 written examination, and Part 3 examination which is a role-play style Clinical Assessment involving multiple tasks. The new pool of examiners will build the capacity the College has to examine Part 3 as there is a growing number of doctors applying for the exam.

Part 3 aims to assess candidates’ ability to apply core clinical and communication skills in the context of the skills, knowledge, attitudes and competencies as defined in the MRCOG curriculum. For this, candidates are examined by Clinical Examiners alongside Lay Examiners. How doctors effectively communicate with and support their patients to understand their health and the choices they have is a crucial part of their role and the care they provide. Lay Examiners are responsible for assessing these skills.

Exams take place several times a year in London. This is a paid opportunity, remunerated at a fee of £125 per day of examining, excluding training days and the briefing session held the day before the examination. Travel is organised and paid for by the College and accommodation is provided for Lay Examiners who cannot travel to and from the College daily, on the days of examinations.

This is the second time the RCOG has recruited Lay Examiners. The College did so two years ago when Lay Examiners were first introduced into the Part 3, and they have since been successfully examining.

You can read the full role description, requirements and application process on web page below.

The closing date for applications is Wednesday 5th September, with a selection and training day scheduled for 25th September.

https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/about-us/get-involved-with-our-work/rcog-roles/part-3-mrcog-lay-examiners/

What do you think about egg freezing?

There has been quite a debate about egg freezing after a call for the NHS to offer egg freezing for women of 30 to 35 as an insurance policy for their future fertility – you can read more about it here. Although the suggestion was supported by the patient charity Fertility Network UK, others didn’t agree, and Lord Winston warned that he felt women risked being exploited by the suggestion. The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists has also called for caution where social egg freezing is concerned. It’s an interesting debate.

Perhaps freezing eggs might for some women save future heartache, but it’s still far from guaranteed that taking this option will result in a baby in the future. As anyone who has experience of IVF knows, having a good stock of eggs doesn’t bring any certainties, and women might need to go through a number of cycles of freezing to have eggs for the future. But could investing in egg freezing save the NHS money in the long run? An egg freezing cycle is essentially the same as an IVF cycle but split into different stages – so you are still harvesting eggs, fertilising them in the laboratory and then replacing them into the womb at a later date. So might you actually end up paying for IVF for women who might not ever need it? The reality is that the majority of people pay for their fertility treatment themselves, and perhaps sorting out the postcode lottery of funding for IVF in England would be a better first move as this is a medical treatment for people who have fertility issues, rather than a medical treatment for people who are trying to insure against having difficulties in the future.  What do you think?

Beyond the Myths of Childlessness

I’ve just finished reading an interesting book by Vivienne Edgecombe called Already Complete – Beyond the Myths of Childlessness which is about finding peace about a future without children. I first met Vivienne when I worked for the charity Fertility Network UK, and asked her to be one of the speakers at a day-long conference I organised for More to Life, the part of the charity which supports those who are living without children. Vivienne gave an amazing and truly inspiring talk about how she had found happiness despite living with involuntary childlessness, so I was excited to read her book.

Vivienne believes that our feelings are governed by our thought processes. Relating this to involuntary childlessness, she explores the idea that how we feel about this is entirely down to our thoughts and that once we see this, we can free ourselves from our thoughts and stop their impact on our feelings. It’s an interesting theory and she puts forward a number of key myths about childlessness which she aims to show are no more than myths. She takes these apart, explaining that they are far from inevitable truths but that the pain we may feel is more to do with the way we believe our thoughts about them. By deconstructing our thoughts, she believes we can free ourself from them. I would be really interested to know how this resonates with those who may have recently stopped treatment or who are in the early days of exploring life without children when they have wanted them. The central theme of Vivienne’s book is that no one needs children in order to be complete as we are already complete, whatever our situation.

Already Complete – Beyond the Myths of Childlessness is available on Amazon at £9.95 and you can also get it as an audiobook. You can find Vivienne’s website at InsideOutChange 

Reproductive harassment

There’s an interesting article in the Daily Mail (yes, really…) about ‘reproductive harassment’ after actor Jennifer Aniston spoke out about being judged and repeatedly questioned about when and whether she is going to have a baby. As she is now 49, this seems a somewhat insensitive question, and yet the pressure on her to reproduce has been kept up by the media for many years. It’s bad enough feeling that pressure in your everyday life as a normal (non-celebrity) person, but imagine how it must feel to see your childlessness discussed by people who know nothing about your individual situation in the global media.

The article explains that this kind of questioning is most often aimed at the woman in a partnership or at single women, and yet people would rarely consider cross-examining a single man in his thirties about when he is going to get round to having a baby or suggesting that he ought not to leave it too late.

As Jennifer Aniston has pointed out, women without children are often judged and misunderstood. She has now hit back saying that maybe her purpose on this planet isn’t to procreate, and that maybe there are other things she is meant to do. Her words will resonate with many of those who have experienced involuntary childlessness, but who have gone on to have very happy and productive lives without children. Check out  Lesley Pyne or Jody Day if you are looking for inspiration.