Need help choosing a fertility clinic?

If you are trying to decide where to have fertility treatment, you may have already found the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority’s new website, but if you haven’t, the Choose a Clinic section is worth checking out. It is much simpler and easier to understand that the previous website and as well as giving details about the clinic and the treatments offered, it also tells you about treatment outcomes at the clinic, how other patients have rated the clinic and about what the HFEA’s inspectors have reported back on the clinic too. If you are trying to work out which clinic is nearest to you and which might be the best for you to visit for treatment, all these factors may be taken into consideration and you can see the clinics as a list or on a map.

There is a wealth of information if you want to look more closely at individual clinics and it’s a very helpful and highly recommended resource for anyone making decisions about where to have their treatment.

Fertility forum advice

I’ve just been reading a fertility forum where there are a number of posts which are apparently from people who’ve had absolutely marvellous treatment at an overseas clinic. There was something about them which sounded rather odd to me and not quite like the way fertility patients usually write about their treatment, so I checked the forum for other posts about the same clinic and there were a whole series of similar posts from different people, all discussing what wonderful experiences they’d had – but also all making exactly the same slightly unusual errors in their English and using the same phrases. Some even had usernames that were similar, and they had all been successful after repeatedly unsuccessful cycles elsewhere but were returning to the forum to tell others about their treatment.

It’s always helpful to read about other people’s experiences, but reading reports online is never quite the same as talking to real people and it is worth being a little cautious, particularly if something doesn’t sound quite right.  I sometimes get comments on Fertility Matters which begin as a discussion about a post and then suddenly veer into an advertising pitch and are clearly not from a genuine fertility patient. I just delete them all, but the online boards are sometimes used for promotional purposes too and it is a good idea to bear that in mind.

What do you want from nurses?

The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) is holding a webinar tomorrow (June 28) to discuss how they enable nurses to best support people’s health and wellbeing. The NMC is currently consulting on standards for nurses, and wants to hear from the public about the skills they feel nurses will need in the future.

This webinar is an opportunity to ask questions and share your views on the proposals the NMC is putting forward for the future. Any members of the public are welcome to participate and they are particularly keen to include people who frequently come into contact with nurses (which includes fertility patients!)

You can find out more and register here

Endometriosis seminar in London

If you want to know more about endometriosis and live in or near London, you may be interested in a seminar in London later this week organised by Wellbeing of Women. It costs £30 to attend but having been to one of their seminars recently, they are extremely well-organised and interesting. This seminar will include information on the  latest updates on endometriosis research with medical information and practical dietary advice to help manage symptoms. Speakers include Professor Andrew Horne and nutritional therapist Rebecca Pilkington.

There is more information and you can book tickets here 

 

Final call for male participants – involuntary childlessness research

Some of you may remember that we have been supporting a researcher, Megumi Fieldsend, in her search for participants for her work on involuntary childlessness. Megumi is now putting out a final call for men who might be willing to help her study on  “life without children – lived experience of a man who wanted to be a dad”. She is aiming to carry out her final interviews by the end of July so if you know someone who might be a potential participant, could you ask him if he would be interested in taking part in Megumi’s research project?

There are set criteria for participation, and if you have any questions about the study or want to check about the criteria, please do get in touch with Megumi who will be happy to answer any questions. You can contact her by calling 0778 026 3685 or by emailing her at
megfieldsend@gmail.com

Focus group for research

We’ve just had a request for people who might be interested in taking part in a focus group to talk about their experiences of fertility problems from Dr Shantel Ehrenberg, a Lecturer in Dance and Theatre, who is leading a research study to investigate and increase awareness of women’s often silent emotional and physical experiences of getting a diagnosis of fertility problems.

She is not a clinician, so there will be no medical information and this isn’t a clinical study, but Shantel is interested in understanding women’s experiences of infertility and sharing her findings with medical professionals and the society-at-large. She wants to use your experiences to help to inform a performance lecture as part of this research. A performance lecture is a thirty-minute presentation that includes text, movement, and visual imagery, presented at conferences and workshops, to help raise awareness about women’s experiences of fertility problems.

The current research project is funded by a University of Surrey Pump Priming Award and approved by the University’s Institutional Ethics Committee.  Compensation is offered for taking part (£25).

​The focus group would be about 90 minutes and include a brief introduction of the project.  The meeting will take place in central London. If you want to know more or are interested in taking part you can contact Shantel by email s.ehrenberg@gsa.surrey.ac.uk or phone  01483683137

New online group for people who are pregnant after fertility treatment

At Fertility Network UK, we have set up a new online group for people who are pregnant after fertility treatment.

Whether you’ve just had a positive pregnancy test or are further down the line, you may be interested in joining our new group which will get together online. If you would like to join the group or to find out more about it, please contact kate@fertilitynetworkuk.org

Breaking bad news

Do you think clinic staff get it right when it comes to breaking bad news to fertility patients? And how do you think that could be improved? Are staff too blunt? Or not blunt enough?

I’ve met so many patients who have felt that things weren’t always handled in the best way, and I’d be keen to find out more about where you think things may go wrong – and what you think might work better.

I’d be really interested to know what you think – you can leave a comment below or use the contact form if you would like to send a private response – http://fertilitymatters.org.uk/contact/

Men wanted to answer survey on fertility

Men can often feel rather left out when it comes to fertility treatment – and the support available to couples can often seem very female-focused. Now, a team from Leeds Beckett University have partnered with Fertility Network UK to try to find out more about men’s experiences of fertility problems. They believe not enough is known about how men cope with fertility issues and will use the results of the research to help to raise awareness of men’s needs.

They will also produce a report at the end of the study and present the findings to health care professionals to ensure that the male perspective is taken into consideration in fertility clinics and in fertility counselling settings.

This survey is completely anonymous so please do fill it in – or get your partner to – and ensure that the researchers get a good response and can start to encourage changes in the support for men during treatment.

You can find the survey here 

Why do people go overseas for IVF?

A new survey of fertility patients looking at overseas treatment carried out for Fertility Network UK and the website Fertility Clinics Abroad has unsurprisingly found that cost is the major reason why people travel for treatment.  Of those who responded to the survey, nearly 80% said fertility treatment in the UK cost twice as much as they were willing or able to pay and 68% said that they would travel for treatment because IVF overseas was generally cheaper.

When people first started travelling overseas for fertility treatment, it was often to access donor eggs but according to this survey most of the respondents were using their own eggs for IVF treatment abroad. The survey found that people believe that treatment can often be offered more quickly abroad. There was also a perception that the standard of care was better overseas with clinics offering a more personalised approach.

Interestingly many were also attracted by the apparently high success rates overseas, but some respondents had noticed that these rates could be confusing and misleading. A majority had said a centralised database of all overseas clinic success rates would be welcome but it would be very hard to verify these rates. Some overseas clinics claim success rates of more than 80% for women using their own eggs for IVF, and it is important to be clear that these rates are not comparable with the figures you will get from a UK clinic as they are using different criteria, are not always including all the patients treated at the clinic and may be giving rates for positive pregnancy tests rather than for live births.

Almost a quarter of respondents wanted to go overseas because they would have access to anonymous donors and it would have been very interesting to find out why they felt this was an advantage – did they feel it was linked to a larger pool of available donors or was it the anonymity itself which was attractive, and if so why. So, a survey which provides some interesting information – and also raises many questions! You can read more details about it here