A doctor’s view of IVF funding cuts

When we hear about cuts to funding for fertility treatment, it’s often presented as yet another Clinical Commissioning Group deciding to reduce what they offer to couples with fertility problems. We hear about the statistics for the tiny number of areas in England where IVF is offered in the way that NICE considers both clinically and cost effective. We hear that in certain parts of the country, commissioners are rationing IVF by making random decisions about who is eligible which have nothing to do with how likely the treatment is to work. We hear about the postcode lottery and how unfair this is within a health service that is meant to be national.

What we don’t hear so much about is what any of this actually means to the real people who have to live with the consequences of these cuts to funding – and that’s why this article from Adam Kay in The Times is so important. For anyone who doesn’t know, Adam Kay is the author of This Is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor’ and worked for a number of years as an obstetrician and gynaecologist.

Adam Kay’s article lays bear the reality of fertility funding cuts as experienced by the patients he saw – the woman who attempted suicide after learning she wasn’t eligible for IVF when she would have been if she lived just five miles away, the grief couples experience when they learn that they won’t be able to access any treatment for their medical condition.  Adam Kay talks about this from the perspective of a professional delivering the news, and that makes this so compelling. It’s such an important point of view and really helps to explain why those who dismiss fertility treatment as a “lifestyle choice” have got it so very wrong.

Thanks to Adam Kay for speaking out to support fertility patients across the UK – and let’s hope for more professionals talking honestly about the impact of funding cuts in their clinics, and what it means to them and to their patients. This really can make so much difference. It’s easy to dismiss statistics about cuts to fertility funding and to ignore concerns about a postcode lottery. It’s not so easy to dismiss the way this affects the lives of real people.

That time of year again…

It’s December and it ought to be a lovely time of year, but if you’re trying to conceive, it can be incredibly painful to find yourself faced with constant reminders of what you don’t have as you have to contend with the endless images of happy smiling families wherever you go. It can make you feel very lonely and isolated, as if you’re the only person who isn’t part of the cheery celebrations, so it’s worth bearing in mind that there are 3.5 million other people in the UK at the moment who are experiencing difficulties getting pregnant and who are probably feeling very much like you are about it all.

You will find lots of advice on how to cope at Christmas, but I think perhaps the most important thing to do is to accept that it’s a difficult time of year – and to do all that you can to look after yourself. Just because it’s Christmas, that doesn’t mean you have an obligation to do things that you know will be difficult or upsetting. Don’t feel guilty about making an excuse if you know you will find your niece’s nursery nativity play or the family Christmas party with your three pregnant cousins a challenge. At this time of year, it’s easy to be double-booked and making an excuse is acceptable. If you want, you can be honest and just say that actually you would find it too upsetting, but other people don’t always understand.

If you have friends who are going through fertility problems, it can be a good time to make arrangements to spend time together and do something different. You may even want to get away completely if you are able to and celebrate in your own way whether that’s a Christmas holiday in the Caribbean (yes, I wish too…), a day out in the countryside, pizza for two at home for Christmas lunch or an all-day long scrabble contest. If you want to do something in the spirit of Christmas, you could consider volunteering for a charity like Crisis which provides Christmas for homeless people or Community Christmas which offers companionship to older people who might otherwise be alone.

If you are struggling to deal with this season, it may be helpful to talk to a fertility counsellor who has the specialist skills and knowledge to understand how you are feeling. Some counsellors offer Skype or telephone counselling services and you can find a list of specialist counsellors on the British Infertility Counselling Association website.

Remember, this is your Christmas too and it’s entirely up to you what you want to do. You don’t need anyone’s blessing to decide that you’re going to branch out on your own and do something completely different, something that will make you happy and that you will enjoy. Think carefully about what might make you feel better and have fun whatever you decide!