Can you help save fertility services in Richmond

NHS Commissioners in yet another area are considering cutting fertility services. This time, it’s Richmond Clinical Commissioning Group which is consulting on whether to continue to offer one fresh and one frozen cycle of treatment or to cut the service entirely. You can give your views by completing their survey –
https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/IVFandICSIconsultation

The consultation closes on Tuesday 4 April 2017, so please do let your views be heard especially if you live in or near Richmond.

The Fertility Show goes to Manchester

Did you know that the Fertility Show will be in Manchester next month? The event which has taken place at London’s Olympia for many years is spreading its wings and will be held at Manchester’s Central Convention Complex in Windmill St on March 25 and 26.

There will be a wide range of speakers including Allan Pacey,  Geeta Nargund, British Fertility Society Chair Adam BalenCharles KingslandSimon Fishel, John Parsons, Rachel Cutting, Jane Stewart, Raj Mathur, Tony Rutherford and Zita West. The HFEA’s Juliet Tizzard will also be speaking as well as specialist lawyer Natalie Gamble and Fertility Fest Director Jessica Hepburn. The sessions will cover a wide range of topics suitable to those just starting out and wanting to know more about their fertility through to more detailed sessions on specific fertility problems and treatment options. There will also be a separate platform for Q and A sessions and a wide range of exhibitors.

Tickets are now on sale here so do come along if you are nearby – I will be there too speaking about how to choose a fertility clinic and will be on the Fertility Network UK stand so come and say hello!

What do the abbreviations mean?

If you’ve been looking at fertility websites or forums (I think it should be “fora” but that sounds too weird), you may have been confused by the abbreviations…

They crop up throughout posts, and at first it can seem as if people are speaking an entirely different language when they talk about TTC (trying to conceive) and being on their 2ww (two week wait) hoping for a BFP (big fat positive – a positive pregnancy test).

Here is a brief guide to some common abbreviations for anyone who may a little help with translation…
A/F = Aunt Flo (period)
AH = Assisted hatching
AI = Artificial insemination
AIH = Artificial insemination by husband
AMH = Anti mullerian hormone
ART = Assisted reproductive technique
BBT = Basal body temperature
BFN = Big fat negative
BFP = Big fat positive
BICA = British Infertility Counselling Association
CD = Cycle day
DE = Donor eggs
DHEA = Dehydroepiandrosterone (a hormone which some believe can be beneficial for women with a low ovarian reserve)
DI = Donor insemination
DH = Darling husband
DPO = Days post ovulation
DPR = Days post retrieval
DP = Darling partner
DPT = Days post transfer
DS = Donor sperm
EC = Egg collection
ENDO = Endometriosis
ET = Embryo transfer
FER = Frozen embryo replacement
FET = Frozen embryo transfer
FP = Follicular phase
FSH = Follicle stimulating hormone
HCG = Human chorionic gonadotropin
HFEA = Human Fertilisation & Embryology Authority
HPT = Home pregnancy test
HRT = Hormone replacement therapy
HSC = Hysteroscopy
HSG = Hysterosalpingogram
ICSI = Intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection
IMHO = In my humble opinion
IMO = In my opinion
IUI = Intra-uterine insemination
IVF = In vitro fertilisation
IYKWIM = If you know what I mean
LAP = Laparoscopy
LH = Luteinising hormone
LMP = Last menstrual period
LP = Luteal phase
LPD = Luteal phase defect
M/C = Miscarriage
OI = Ovulation induction
OHSS = Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome
OPK = Ovulation predictor kit
PCOS = Polycystic ovary syndrome
PESA Percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration
PG = Pregnant
PI = Primary infertility
PID = Pelvic inflammatory disease
PMS = Pre-menstrual syndrome
POF = Premature ovarian failure
SI = Secondary infertility
TESA = Testicular sperm aspiration

And finally HTH (hope that helps)!

Have you had fertility treatment in the UK?

Could you help a researcher by filling in a survey? I know I am always posting links to surveys and research – but I do think it’s a good idea to do these whenever we can because every piece of research helps further understanding of what it’s really like to be a fertility patient and how it feels to go through treatment.

This particular survey is being carried out by an MBA researcher who previously worked in a fertility clinic and is totally anonymous but will be used for part of her MBA. Do feel free to share the link with anyone who has had or is having fertility treatment in the UK – you can access it here https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/JSXXS25

Support for endometriosis

I was delighted to be asked to join an Endometriosis UK support group last night to talk about fertility treatment and support. If you have endometriosis, I’d really recommended checking out Endometriosis UK and the excellent support they can offer.

The online group ran really smoothly and efficiently, and they also have support groups running across the country and an online community too. They have lots of incredibly useful information on their website, and do a lot of work to raise awareness of endometriosis, which often goes undiagnosed.

It was great to be able to talk to some of the members last night – inevitably our discussions came round to the postcode lottery of access to fertility treatment and we talked about the realities of going through IVF and getting support amongst many other things. Thank you to all at Endometriosis UK for asking me to join you!

Running for the right to try

If you read this blog at all regularly, it won’t have escaped you that I am a huge fan of the brilliant Jessica Hepburn, Director of Fertility Fest and author of The Pursuit of Motherhood. You may have followed her Channel Swim to raise funds for Fertility Network UK, and now she’s doing it again with the London Marathon.

Jessica has written a fantastic blog post about this and if you want to read more about what she’s doing and why, you can find it here. There’s also a link to her JustGiving page where you can make a donation to support her through her 26 miles. For me, 10k feels like a marathon, and I think it’s a wonderful thing that she is doing – so support her if you possibly can and help to make it even more worthwhile.

Secondary infertility

The fact that fertility problems can occur for people who had no trouble conceiving their first child often comes as something of a surprise – and yet it’s very common. You may have seen the article in The Guardian this weekend by journalist Sarfraz Manzoor about the difficulties he and his wife experienced when they tried for a second child – a subject author Maggie O’Farrell had also written about in the paper some years ago. The magazine Fertility Road covered the subject recently, and it is great that it is being talked about.

All too often, there’s an assumption that secondary infertility is somehow less of a problem because you aren’t childless – and yet in fact the pain it causes may be different, but it is still a deeply distressing problem. Parents can feel guilty about not being able to provide a sibling for their child, and it can be very difficult to escape pregnant women and babies when you have a young child.

People sometimes put off seeking medical advice if they are experiencing secondary infertility having conceived without a problem in the past. In fact, there are no guarantees when it comes to fertility and it is actually more common to have a problem second time around than it is not to be able to have a child in the first place. Sometimes the difficulties you are experiencing are just down to the fact that you are older than you were when you got pregnant before, but there can be other medical problems which may have occurred in the interim. If it is taking you longer than you would have liked to get pregnant again, you should visit your GP in just the same way that you would do for primary infertility – so usually after a year of trying unsuccessfully or after 6 months if you are over 35.

Male fertility evening

It is often noted that there’s a lack of support for men going through fertility problems and it is certainly true that much of the help on offer is aimed primarily at women. Now, for the first time, one London clinic is offering tailored support for men.

Andrology Solutions is running a male fertility evening on February 16th with a guest speaker, Gareth Down, and a team of andrologists at hand to answer any male fertility questions. You can find out more here.

Fertility Day of Action

If you’re concerned by the postcode lottery for fertility treatment, you can join the Fertility Network UK Day of Action on 25 March. You don’t have to go out marching anywhere, but just a few small actions can make all the difference

There are three ways you can join in –

  • Contact your MP, Tell them how the postcode lottery is affecting you and what is happening in your local area. You can find out more about how to find your MP’s contact details and what you might want to say in an email or letter here on the Fertility Network UK website.
  • You can tweet your support using the hashtags #IVFx3 #tellyourMP #righttotry
  • You can help create a fertility funding Thunderclap – a social media message sent collectively – on Facebook, Twitter and tumblr on Saturday 25 March at 3pm. Register your support for the Thunderclap at https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/52716-the-right-to-try-campaign

Fertility guidelines from the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) say that if you should be able to access 3 full cycles of NHS IVF if you under 40 and eligible for treatment, An overwhelming 98 per cent of England’s 209 local clinical commissioning groups (CCGS) do not follow this guidance fully and have either cut the number of IVF cycles they offer and ration services by introducing additional non-medical access criteria, such as denying IVF to individuals if their partner has a child from a previous relationship.

Do join in and help your charity to help you to make a difference!

 

Night shifts and your fertility

A really interesting new study has found that women who worked night shifts or who had jobs involving heavy lifting produced fewer eggs when having fertility treatment than those who worked normal day shifts. The research team from the United States investigated around 500 women who filled in detailed questionnaires about their work shift patterns and any heavy lifting involved in their jobs. The researchers found that there were clear differences in the number of eggs produced by women who worked at night and those who did heavy lifting at work.

I found this study particularly fascinating as I worked night shifts before I started trying to conceive, and was very aware of the negative impact it had on my overall health – but often wondered whether it could affect fertility too. This was an observational study – which means the researchers were not linking cause and effect but just seeing what happened with the different groups of women and fertility experts have urged caution in interpreting the results. However, if you are doing a job which involves working nights or a lot of heavy lifting and are having difficulty getting, the study would suggest it may be worth investigating if there is anything you can do to change your shift pattern or lifting at work.

You can read the full details of the research from the Journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine here along with reports from The Telegraph and the Evening Standard.